#128 Allie Delury & Pat Bonner – The healing nature of travel in Australia   

Travel plays a key role in individual healing and expansion, and Australia has for a long time been a popular destination for such travel. With this in mind, this week I was able to connect into that with Allie Delury & Pat Bonner, a couple from America who are exploring our country in a small orange van for 12 months.

Having both served time in the US Air force in demanding role, these guys aren’t just bumming out. Pat is refining his stand-up comedy skills across Australia while Allie creates travel content for companies back in the US.

This conversation get real very quickly and we cover a lot of ground, from the check to identity from leaving the military and avoiding the draw of the ‘shoulds’ of the life are pressed upon us through to the relationship learnings from living in the crucible of a small van environment and need to understand and article personal needs to those closest to you.

Throughout this story, Australia and its people play a key role as the muse and the backdrop to their journey and travels. Often Pat and Allie come back to the opportunities to enjoy real human connection as they explore the land and culture – either through conversation or laughter.

Pat and Allie are just wonderful and lovely people both individually and as a couple

Whether you have travelled and want to reconnect to that part of you, or you’re thinking about taking the first step out there, this is a must listen to.

Read Full Transcript

Bryn 

Those who know me will know that for a long time, I felt that travel plays a key role in individual growth, healing and expansion. And Australia for a long, long time has been a popular destination for search travel, is with this in mind that this week, I was able to connect into that directly with Ali deLory and Pat baner, a wonderful couple from America, who are exploring our country in a small orange band for 12 months. Having both served time in the US Air Force in demanding roles. These guys aren’t just bombing about parties refining his stand up comedy skills across Australia. While Ali creates travel content for companies back in the US. Obviously they are enjoying themselves and having a great time as well. This conversation gets real very quickly. And we cover a lot of ground, from the chat to their identity from leaving the military and avoiding the Draw of the shoulds of life that impressed upon us through to the relationship learning from living in the crucible of a small van environment and the need to understand and articulate personal needs to those closest to you. Throughout this story, Australia and its people play a key role as the museum backdrop to their journey and travels often pattern alley come back to the opportunities to enjoy real human connection as they explore the London culture, either through conversation or laughter. parnelli are just wonderful, lovely people, both individually and as a couple and I was just so chuffed that they reached out and asked to come on the podcast and I seize this opportunity. Whether you have travelled and want to reconnect back to that part of you, or you are thinking about taking the first steps to go out there. This is a must listen to. So enjoy. Pattern alley. Hello, welcome back to who. I’m your host, Bryn Edwards We haven’t been fun today. I have two guests all at once today, because let’s not forget, Australia is a great place to come and travel. In fact, we have loads of tourists and I myself came on a big adventure, which was sort of according to manhood in my life. Anyway. So today we’re going to have a look at Australia through the eyes, as well, with my guests, Lori and Patrick de Bona

 

Pat Bonner 

ya know, so nicely had to say it twice. Yeah.

 

Bryn 

Guys, where are you from?

 

Pat Bonner 

Colorado, Fort Collins, Colorado. So if you’re unfamiliar, that’s a by the mountains. Yeah. The cool part of us. Yes.

 

Bryn 

Cool. And just give me an overview. Tell me about your travels. Because right now maybe we were going to do it in the band. But right now there’s a funky looking Aryan fan park

 

Pat Bonner 

right outside. Oh, yeah. The Magic toolbox. You want The overview. Yeah,

 

Allie Delury 

for sure. So, we came over here from the States back in November. We’re here for a year, we’re doing a working holiday visa kind of thing. And we got the van within our first month. And it’s been awesome. We’ve had the flexibility to go to Adelaide. We’re here now in Perth to the southern part of Western Australia. So it’s just been such a wild ride literally and figuratively.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yeah, it’s been great. Great hospitality here in Australia. Yeah, I’ve been really friendly.

 

Bryn 

asked you about that a bit. So just to get a bit of an overview and an idea of YouTube because look, I didn’t just decide to do a party. You know, Ali reached out to me last week and and I didn’t just decide to pick any Oh, you know, so dodgy backpackers.

 

Bryn 

So yeah, tell me a bit about you too, because you you both veterans, a train and America. So you know, for Listen to these a note. So Tina is spotty, so dodgy?

 

Pat Bonner 

Yeah, we’ve had an interesting background. So we just both met. While we were living in Italy, we were both stationed there. In the Air Force. We were both Air Force officers. I don’t wanna speak for you and tell your story but so I was a joint terminal attack controller, which means I would embed with usually army units. Yeah, and I would control airstrikes. So combat heavy job very stressful. And I did that for about eight years. So either do that, like, puts the laser on it? I mean, that’s a very Yes. That’s a mix it up. Yeah. That’s, you got good terminology. A little bit too much Call of Duty maybe. But yeah, that’s that’s a that’s the exciting part of the job. Yeah. I mean, in all actuality, I’d say 90% of it is is hanging around in garrison doing paperwork, that type of stuff as an officer, but the 10% is is combat intensive. So a lot of deployments did Afghanistan and Iraq and then after years as a captain be kind of advanced where you rank out of kind of doing that stuff, which I found to be boring. Like all the admin stuff. Yeah. So as I progressed in rank, I kind of lost interest in the paperwork aspect of the job and decided to get out. Yeah,

 

Allie Delury 

yeah, yeah. And that’s really my story too. I did two years as a public affairs officer. So I was essentially doing PR overseas in Italy. That’s how I met Pat. And then the last three years of my military career, I was a combat camera officer. So I was in charge of training Airmen to go out and document combat from the air and the ground. So that was so fun. I got to travel all over to political places, and you know, just try to be a little bit of a badass not like pad.

 

Pat Bonner 

cameras, pretty badass.

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah, it was so fun. But as an officer, you can only really do that. Yeah.

 

Allie Delury 

It’s ridiculous. Like I would have like and I’m nine and I’m four and like two camera bodies, all my lenses. All my my gear. PP, so, it was a lot and especially as a dainty little woman, it’s sometimes it’s, it’s tough out there with all that stuff. But it was so fun. And it taught me so much about documenting travel, which I got to do later on, and all that good stuff. So just quickly,

 

Bryn 

why the force is watching?

 

Pat Bonner 

Well, that’s, I mean, that’s a good question. Nobody really joins the military and things are going great. So I joined when I was I did ROTC, which is a Reserve Officer Training, commissioning programme. So basically, in college, you can compete for scholarship, and then you owe the military some time after you graduate. Yeah, so I needed to pay for school because my freshman year I kind of messed around a little bit too much. And they yanked my academic scholarship. So I needed I needed money. I wanted to graduate so I looked at the Air Force and looked like a pretty good programme that seemed to be where the smart people win if they were We’re going to join the military. So I was like, I think I might be smart. We’ll try that. They accepted me. They gave me a scholarship. And then I owed them time afterwards and to tell you, my first eight, seven and a half years in the military were it was a lot of fun. I met great people, and I don’t I definitely don’t regret it. But it was a it was definitely spurred by a little bit of patriotism, but a lot of necessity, right?

 

Bryn 

Yeah. And what about so

 

Allie Delury 

honestly, same, I mean, primary reason was to piss off my family a little bit, so I was rebellious. You know, I wanted to do something. Yeah. Cuz I’m the first person in my family in my generation to join the military. So it’s not like I had people to look up to where I’m like, all I want to do that. I just kind of did it on my own. But it was kind of the same reason Honestly, I was in a really competitive journalism programme at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities of Minneapolis and I got in to their school and they were really strict about the grades that you needed to get. I partied a little too much my first semester, so I got booted and waitlisted from the school and they said, we’re not going to consider you unless you turn it around your second semester freshman year. So I was kind of panicking and I was like, Okay, I need to like think of some things I might be kicked out of college. And, you know, I looked at ROTC same programme is the way to pay for school. And I got wrapped up in my journalism career career while I was doing that programme, so I was a little bit of the black sheep, both within the military community and the media community while I was going through all of that, so that was an interesting learning curve, but same thing I did not know what to expect with the military. I got to Italy I was 22 years old, then Gaza just happen. And I was kind of put in charge of the crisis communication strategy for for all of that as a 22 year old so I spent only two years in Italy but really, I aged like 10 years of my life, in my maturity, but it was such a good experience. That really set everything out for what I ended up doing later on in my life both with the military and outside of the military. So yeah, kind of same deal.

 

Bryn 

Tree can’t be comedies cuz it’s such a struggle wanted to stand is not be that

 

Bryn 

shit tonne of structure do this do that and and yeah it starts with a real level of indoctrination and that can become part of your imagining you’re part of your identity that’s pulled out or you know that

 

Pat Bonner 

yeah you’re kind of fed as a sense of purpose when you’re in so yeah, at least for me when I got out, it felt like the rug was kind of pulled out from under me purpose wise, you know, I took a job as a pharmaceutical salesman, so you know, selling pharmaceutical drugs pretty easy. lucrative, but it was just it felt like I was spinning my wheels. You know what I didn’t get any life? Yes, exactly. And I was having the same conversation with doctors and clinics and it was just the day in day out is Groundhog’s Day, same stuff every single day. And that was you didn’t get that in the military. Yeah, kind of the the fraternity or the Brotherhood. I was in a combat centric job. So it was almost entirely male men in that job. So it was definitely like a brotherhood too. So the support structure around that you had friends built in you worked out every morning then you work with them in the office and then you deployed in went to war with them. So there was like a very strong bond even with people that you didn’t, you had nothing in common with

 

Bryn 

you The training is from what I understand is that the pursuit of excellence because your life It depends.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yes, absolutely. Yes, everybody wants to respond to the year 100%.

 

Bryn 

Everyone quite enjoys diving down below. I

 

Pat Bonner 

know you’re 100% right on that. My jobs very competitive too. So like everybody was striving and pushing each other to get better. And if you weren’t good, like you were ostracised that was if you didn’t take your job seriously, that was you were the lowest common denominator. People didn’t want to be around you. So it really didn’t matter where you stood politically, what what your personality type was. Even your sexual orientation. any of that stuff didn’t matter if you were trying to be the best in your job. Yeah, you were part of the Brotherhood. Yeah, that’s it. So going into civilian world definitely wasn’t like that. You hit the nail on the head. Yeah, yeah.

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah. I mean, they tell you when you’re transitioning out of the military, they make you go through this like very short, abbreviated course, where they teach you how to write a resume and try to integrate you back into civilian life. And for me, it was real life like it is it’s you go through it, it’s a requirement. And for me, I had a civilian career before the military so it wasn’t as daunting for me to leave. But a lot of people if you’re doing that for 20 years, and you’ve never had to write a resume before, you’ve never had to compete for a job before, like, all of that. I mean, it’s just it’s so much all at once to deal with. And a lot of people struggle with, you know, just having a community outside of the military community who understands who has gone through it, who maybe saw the same stuff you have good or bad. And really, the Brotherhood, it is so tight, and it’s for in the US, what is it 1% of the population is voluntary. So you’re just already such a small percentage, and that is really, really tough. And even me, someone who did stuff before the military to get out, I struggled as well to kind of find that balance and find people who really could understand what I went through, as I would say, combat camera, and they’d be like, Oh, that’s what, like, that’s cool. But can you run an ad campaign with Google? And I’m like, what, I never had to do that but my skin are like so much more qualified than and so it’s it’s tough trying to explain that to people. Yeah. And, and that in and of itself is like a whole new journey where you have to kind of reinvent yourself and find yourself

 

Bryn 

again. But then surely that in there as well. You know, you’ll see some stuff get stressful traumatic situations.

 

Pat Bonner 

That’s true. Yes. Yeah, yes both for that. Um, yeah, yeah, they’re the the military is getting a lot better with it. I’m not going to say they’re perfect. I think the suicide rates kind of show that they’re not. The suicide rates have held pretty consistently high over the last several years. I think that’s a byproduct of almost 20 years before you know, that’s, but they’re, they’re figuring it out. I think they understand that it takes a lot more back end support for psychologically, to remove that stigma. I know I went through some real low points when I got out when I was in, it was just like, Okay, this is the running pace. I can keep pace Everybody’s we’re all in it, we all get it. And then yes, it absolutely is normalised. And then I took myself out of that situation, and I lost that brotherhood that support and I felt isolated. And we’d done the distance thing we’d gone back and forth and it was just it just compounds and compounds and compounds until you’re at the point where like, Whoa How How did I get here? How did mentally How did I How did I let myself slip to this point where my brain is now poisoning me with you know? I mean, you have you just have like the depression you have suicidal thoughts, but not necessarily see like you want to kill yourself you just like you start feeling that way and you start like having these these images in your head, you’re like, I know this is wrong. What How long have I been feeling this way? How am I Why aren’t I talking about this? And like and I think a lot of that is the self is a stigma self derived, you know, you don’t want to feel weak. You don’t want to Yeah, yeah, you’re right. Like, you know, people People who’ve seen way worse, done way harder things than you. So like, Can I justify feeling this bad about myself? Even you know, when you start feeling like that and you start like, okay, unpack that, put that on the side and then start understanding the thoughts you’re having and the depression you’re in. And I think that’s like one of the first steps of getting out of it as you like, Okay, my brain is poisoning right now. I can’t trust my brain. And then you start kind of digging yourself out, you start treating yourself better, making sure you’re taking care of yourself physically drink enough water, not drinking as much booze. You know, like, that’s the start just getting back on the right track and realising, okay, I don’t have the same support structure with the same people around me that have been through the same thing. So I have to take care of myself in a different way. Yeah, yeah.

 

Allie Delury 

I think it’s interesting too, because PTSD and the effects of it, it can hit you differently and different variables at different times. And a lot of people they do like repeat deployments, and they think, well, I’ve done this before and it was okay. You know, I did This the last deployment that I went on was over the summer and it meant more long distance for us. And I remember thinking going into it Well, we’ve done longer dated distance apart. We’ve we’ve done this before multiple times, like it’ll be okay. And, and it affected us differently this time seemingly out of nowhere. I think just because it was we’ve been doing it for so long that finally our brain was just like, no, like, this isn’t okay. Like, you need to start got what is supposed

 

Bryn 

to make you Toka wakens because it’s the scaffolding Yes. Failed to tell yourself story to make yourself feel better.

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah, right. But there’s no room. For sure. Yeah, definitely. So I mean, that has been a very recent struggle for us and something that we had to navigate through our relationship. And we talked about a little bit on our podcast, I think Episode Five, we really like dive deep into what that did, to our relationship and how we got through And all that good stuff. So,

 

Bryn 

yeah, that was the podcast in a minute. Yeah. So Australia. Yeah. Why?

 

Pat Bonner 

So we I mean, we both lived abroad. So I think one of the commonalities we shares is the, the need or the lust for adventure something something more and wanting to travel, and we both lived abroad. And it’s great living wild places, but living in a place that speaks English is definitely very convenient. So we knew we wanted to live abroad again. And we both seen Europe and to be honest, England is kind of a bore. So we figured, let’s go let’s go to Australia. They have a they seem to have the infrastructure for kind of a backpackers van life, which which I think would suit us to do to try long term, short term I guess. But that’s that’s essentially the first step and why we chose Australia. Yeah. What did you know about Australia beforehand? Crocodile Dundee

 

Bryn 

Yeah, they got

 

Pat Bonner 

a bunch of crocodiles. Yeah, crocodiles poisonous snakes. tarantulas great white sharks. Yeah. Boomerang

 

Bryn 

awesome mythical National Geographic. That’s exactly right.

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah.

 

Bryn 

Yeah, exactly. So where did the idea come to Australia come about

 

Allie Delury 

last year,

 

Pat Bonner 

last year? Well, we kind of kicked it around, you know, it’d be great if we, if we lived in Australia for a little while. And then we’re like, Yeah, that would be great. I think we could do that. And we’re trying to find a time to do it. And I just liked my job. Allie was coming back from her deployment. And we were kind of looking at our schedule and like, like, if we don’t do it now, you know, we’re never going to do it. Exactly. Now we’re engaged. So we’re going to be married will likely have kids at some point. So if all those things start coming, yeah, we can’t do it after that. Yeah. So we’re just like, if we’re going to do it, let’s quit our jobs. And let’s let’s make the move. Yeah. Not about yet two months ago for better rewards.

 

Bryn 

Like obviously, you don’t strike me as like a obsessive planets that you

 

Pat Bonner 

will do this sort of thing.

 

Bryn 

Yes. But did you have any sort of idea about what you wanted to get out of the trip before?

 

Pat Bonner 

Yeah, so I mean, I’m a stand up comedian. I’ve been doing that for several years at this point. And I wanted to go Yeah, I wanted to go to a place that speaks English because of what I didn’t want to take a step back in. In my growth as a stand up comedian in Australia has a pretty vibrant scene. Yeah. Though there there are pockets You know, this pocket in Perth, there’s a little bit in Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney are obviously big markets Brisbane. So you know, we figure if we’re going to travel around we can grab a van travelled to all these places. I want to get good at stand up. I want to get better at stand up. I think I’m okay and And we wanted to get our podcasts going like with good content stuff that people would find interesting. Yeah. And Van lifing through Australia, we thought was would be compelling content for two veterans with different worldview with stand up comedy and as a content creator and photographer. Yeah, I’m pretty good.

 

Allie Delury 

For sure. Yeah. So I do content creation for various travel clients, one of them being Tastemade travel. It’s a big online social media as travel content hub based in LA and New York. And so Australia, I mean, that’s so easy to get travel content because you guys have everything here. Right? Like you obviously have the beaches, you have amazing, vibrant, diverse cities. Yeah, you got the outback, like you just have a lot that, you know, everyone goes to Europe for like their euro trip. They go to Southeast Asia, they do Bali. So I think people are kind of itching to see what else is out there. And Australia I don’t want to say is underrepresented but I think there’s just so much that people assume about Australia stuff that we assumed about Australia that just barely hits the surface, right? Like it’s just a glacier of stuff to do. And we’ve been so surprised since being here some of the places we’ve seen like Esperance ALU our mind beautiful. Yeah. You know, like the Nullarbor. I didn’t even know that was a thing before we had to trek across it. So it’s just, there’s a lot that I think people don’t know about Australia that is fun, and cool and different. And exciting. And as for travel companies around the world, they want that content. So pay no brainer.

 

Bryn 

In this context. People made a Yeah, God back in America.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yeah. Well, foreigners, anybody, anybody who would travel here, we’ve met a lot of Europeans. We bought our our band from a from a European. Yeah. Yeah. And it’s Sony. So I think there’s a everybody’s kind of interested in coming to Australia. Yeah. I mean, we love showcase on it. Yeah.

 

Bryn 

So what was before you got here? What was reception from, you know, close friends and family when you went Australia.

 

Allie Delury 

That’s exactly at least my family was like, wait, what are you doing? Like you’re 30 years old? Maybe living in the house that you bought? Or Shouldn’t you be trying to get like a well paying job somewhere? So there it was shock from my friends and family.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yeah, a little caution concerned from my family. But I think my friends, there was a definitely a tinge of jealousy. Oh, yeah. Yeah. When we were telling them, they were just like, Ah, so many people talk about that you guys are actually doing it? Yeah. So I think there’s a I think there’s a feeling that a lot of people wish they could just pick up and go a little bit more than they can. Yeah.

 

Bryn 

Yeah. I can imagine. Yeah, you would, you would trigger off a few people.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yes. You can just you can just leave it behind doing it.

 

Bryn 

Yeah, and that coupled with triggering off other people who are giving you

 

Pat Bonner 

This shows Yes.

 

Bryn 

All linear life journey. You’ve done this now. So now the next step.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yes.

 

Bryn 

Yeah. Well,

 

Pat Bonner 

you know, we both like what I did in the Air Force was, you know, highly selective, very difficult thing. It was kind of like living out a childhood dream, you know. So again, you’d already checked you already lived one lifetime This is how I felt. Yeah, so let’s do something else. That’s crazy. That’s fulfilling. Yeah, that will that will stroke all those all those urges that I have for adventure. Yeah. Excellent.

 

Bryn 

Yeah. So briefly be here. What couple months?

 

Pat Bonner 

Yeah, two months. We just eclipse the two month mark. places you’ve been to just server so we started in Melbourne, and then we moved over to Adelaide. We stopped a couple of places on the way cactus beach profit day for Lincoln and aspirants and now out here in Perth. Yeah. Yeah.

 

Bryn 

So that’s awesome. In that little band which I say outside

 

Pat Bonner 

with occasional headphone breaks from each other but

 

Pat Bonner 

it’s a little

 

Pat Bonner 

too so far it hasn’t been that bad. I

 

Bryn 

mean you learned about actually cuz particularly because you say you were on deployment at a time so you know absolutely some distance right the heart grow fonder and realise people and now Capone during

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah.

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah. Well, I mean I think you hit a good point I have already learned so much about Pat just having to live in such a small space for such a long period of time. And back in the states even when we were together. We kind of had our own lives a little bit still like a pat obviously still acted comedy. He had friends who did comedy I did other stuff. I did content creation, I had friends who were photographers in the area who I went to school with. So we were always able to take that break if we needed it. But here, it’s a lot harder to take that break because we have to at least drive to the same spot together to take that break. So, um, I don’t know, for me, I’ve just I’ve learned so much about Pat and

 

Bryn 

you have to instil some real boundaries and actually, I need timeout. So Hello, this is me. Mommy talking across you. Guys, it’s easy to take the natural break. Yes, my friend Ryan, for those who want to go for a drink. I don’t do that. You know. So you get a little bit here in the crystal of the van. It’s like, I want some time. Yeah, so that means I was helplessly taking time out for me.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yeah. So no, we like we do like what I’ve learned is how to communicate. I think a little bit just like directly when I’m feeling that way. way I can just say, Hey, I’m gonna read I’m gonna grab this book I’m just gonna go sit on the beach for you know, I just need I need nothing I need to just be alone

 

Pat Bonner 

yeah and she’s done the same and it’s it’s honestly it’s kept us pretty good Did you

 

Bryn 

get the star or did you have to come to a bit of a

 

Allie Delury 

we had to come we had to figure it out a little bit the hard way I think to kind of realise like okay like we need we need space right we’re dehydrated we’re tired we’ve been slept because we’re incognito campaign like okay we we just need a little bit of a break like I need to work out he needs to read it listen to a podcast so so we’ve had to kind of come to those climaxes in the in the frustration and, and the you know, just build up of anger just not because of each other, per se but because of us personally just still going through our own. Whatever has been travelling because I think people look at what we’re doing and they think oh my god you guys are doing a year. long vacation. That is so yeah. And it’s like it was a true holiday.

 

Bryn 

I remember when the most irritating things in my life is 1998 I went to South America four and a half months rice blew my brains. Yeah. Right. I came back at somebody in the local town, but how was your big holiday?

 

Allie Delury 

Live? You still go through life, even if it’s in a different place? Yeah, I think people assume as long as you’re not home, you’re just on vacation. That’s definitely not the case. It

 

Pat Bonner 

hasn’t been bad though. I honestly, I mean, is it that I haven’t had to take that much time. It’s not like every day I need a break from her. It’s just like, every once in a while, if I’m driving, I’ll just put on a podcast. It’s just kind of for me and she’ll sit and edit or stuff and we just have, we take our breaks and focus on like, whatever it is that we’re doing independently, but we’re never too far. apart. No. Yeah,

 

Bryn 

this was great to hear about that as you learned how to sew? Yes, still, in that close environment

 

Pat Bonner 

of the relationship, yeah. And forces you to put, like, I have to continually think about her needs because if I’m not meeting them, she’s gonna bite my head off, you know, like, I’m gonna make her irritable and grouchy just making sure that you know, I’m rubbing her back as the sun goes down that type of thing. You know, I’m not, I’m not closed off. You know, I’m not thinking internally all the time. I’m taking care of her as much as I can. Because that that still pays off for me, you know, keeping her happy. Makes me less grouchy as well, you know, and I think she’s found in same same weave. Yeah, I think it’s certainly helped us grow anything. It’s made me more sure of my, my, my efforts to marry the woman. Oh,

 

Allie Delury 

yeah. I mean,

 

Allie Delury 

it’s taught me at least one You do to self soothe, you know what I mean? Like what your self care routine looks like. Because like I said, back in the States, it was easy just to be like, All right, I’m going to go drink with friends. And then we’re separate. We’re doing our own thing, but we’re not seeing what the other person needs to, you know, self through. So it’s, I’ve been able to see that firsthand, really kind of for the first time and be like, Okay, this is what makes him happy in these terms of stress, like, I’ll make sure to do. Yeah, yeah, exactly. So it’s just it’s been a crazy learning curve. All for the better, I think. Yeah, but you do hear the nightmare stories. I follow a couple of Van life influencers on social media. And there was this one girl who was Same deal engaged, they were going to do the whole thing in Australia. They got two weeks in and called off. Oh, the way everything yeah. And she did like a whole emotional post about it. And it really just came down to they were living in this fantasy in their minds their whole life. Like this is the pedestal I’ve put this person up on this is a How Greater Life is going to be in the van. And they didn’t even consider the stresses and the negatives that come with that. And I think if you live in that mindset, of course, it’s a recipe for disaster because you need to resolve all conflict within the constraints of the van, you know, you don’t have the option to do anything different. So I do see a lot of crash and burn stories. But I’m with full confidence can say that we’re not Yeah.

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah.

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah. Oh, yeah.

 

Pat Bonner 

To go recommend it for anybody who’s engaged.

 

Bryn 

So that’s you as a couple, obviously, I found when I was travelling, that you know, you have so much more space and time and less distraction, and there are moments you know, travelling on another ball and just looking out the window. And so stuff will come up. And you know, and it can be awkward. It can be exciting. It can be a tear jerking and stuff. What sort of stuff said that you know that we talked about YouTube together? What about individually as well? this one because I found that charming is also where the most cathartic and healing things you can do.

 

Pat Bonner 

Oh, yeah. Now I mean I, I stress out about you know breaking off from that like you said that step by step success through life like oh you’re at this part of your life now you got to go do this or you bought a house and now you got to get married and you gotta have a good so you know, I grew up a pretty conservative family raised Catholic so very tight structure. So there’s still parts of me that are like, Oh my god, I’m breaking from all of that structure is am I making a huge mistake? Am I you know, I’ve alius hitched her waggon to me a little bit of my taken Am I ruining her life? You know, I’m like going through these things of like self doubt that I have to kind of, I have to extinguish myself and like, tell myself this is my this is our life. This is my life. life this is these are the choices I get to make because I’m in charge of my own my own shit. So then I’m full your own. Yes, exactly. And so I have to keep kind of coaching myself to that point where it’s just like it don’t trust the structure. There are plenty of people who have followed those steps to ruin. You know, there are tonnes of people who have followed those steps too deep on happiness. Yeah. And what I’m doing is I’m just making me happy. And I think it’s making

 

Allie Delury 

those doubts. I’m like, shut up, look at where we are. Look at what we’re doing. This is the coolest thing I’ve ever done in my life. And it’s because of you. It’s because of your support. It’s because you’re doing this with me, you know? So sometimes we can get just inundated with the stress of like, doubt. And is this what I’m supposed to be doing? Like, am I meeting these, these benchmarks that I’ve made for myself and all these different categories of my life, but I mean, yeah, it’s

 

Bryn 

Reality

 

Allie Delury 

Exactly. And social media doesn’t help right? It makes things worse because you see the best of everyone

 

Pat Bonner 

else realised

 

Bryn 

everything that perfect, excellent slither their life, and then there was someone else’s stickle that slithers together and it’s like, shit. Yeah.

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah, I would just have to force myself to kind of snap out of it and be like, this is like we’re doing something really cool right now like, and this is just, we’re never gonna be able to do anything of this magnitude at least for a while after this. So I mean, I’m loving every minute of it. the good and the bad is interesting,

 

Bryn 

you bring up the social media as well, because the big thing that I’ve been thinking about and deep diving in just in the last couple of weeks, because I’m quite a stickler for my podcast in that I’ve done to to two interviews via zoo in the whole time, and I didn’t enjoy them to do it again. Unless, like, you know, the Queen race really loved. But yeah, I make a real point of having the real conversation with people It means I get to meet different and interesting people. And I’ve been deep diving more into this and the fact that you know, when people talk they’re exchanging information lights at so many different levels, you know, the way our heartbeats you know, he’s talking to one another way we’re breathing is all seeking out because we’re all in rapport pheromones this so much level, so much on so many levels and also when you do actually have a proper real conversation with someone and you, it helps to shape and maintain your identity wherever is you know, what social media is not designed to provide Healthy feedback. And so therefore, the place we get into now is just by even me just doing this once a week, twice a week, the amount of times I get to do it as a healing cathartic fact. Yeah, for me as a human. Right. And so, the other thing I wanted to ask you guys was cuz you’ve been meeting new and interesting people, like, even fucking sharp, right? Yeah, just different from America, and this is Australia. So have you found that?

 

Pat Bonner 

Kinda, we’re talking about that this morning a little bit.

 

Pat Bonner 

People are very outgoing. You know, they had we had a conversation while we were grilling up a little bacon at the park today. And there was over I don’t know 40 metres away some guy thrown a stick with his dog was was chatting with us just holler and like, Oh, are you guys from like, the states and he’s like, Hi, you’re loving that. Like people are funny. They’re there. Quick to make a joke, you know, and I feel like I don’t know, people are a little bit more closed off in the States. I don’t know if it’s because they’re absorbed with their phone or whatever they’ve got going on. Maybe we’re just used to people in the city kind of having that bristled approach to life but people are very very forthright in like throwing a comment your way like joking around with you. We saw a woman on the beach who was just commented on your bikini, like Oh, I can’t wear that and then like hiked it up her butt cheeks and was like saying and we’re like

 

 

wild Yeah.

 

Pat Bonner 

So it’s it’s been pretty nice. People are very, very kind and they’re warm, I guess is really the warm conversational. Have you found

 

Bryn 

yourself getting pulled into some really? what I call the two types conversations summit. This is transactional one

 

 

enjoyed it. Yeah, yeah.

 

Bryn 

Yeah, you live in Australia. Yeah, we’re proud of Australia. But then there’s the more deeper relationship Once we get to super light to people that exchange ideas and must be gay,

 

Pat Bonner 

I find that mostly with the friends I’ve made in comedy so far, people are like very they’re very interested in my point of view being from the States was as a very robust stand up comedy environment. So does Australia so they’re like they’re picking my brain about that next thing you know, we’re talking kind of worldview stuff and kind of their life philosophy and it’s just, it kind of grows and grows and grows and we’ve made some pretty good friends that way. Yeah,

 

Allie Delury 

it’s been so unreal. So we started in Melbourne, I’m doing the work away programme.

 

Allie Delury 

And, and it was like a horrible situation. We had like a psycho as a host that we were trying to get out of the situation. And we didn’t have the band yet. We didn’t have any sort of like accommodation. So we reached out on couch surfing, which is something I did in my 20s when I was backpacking Europe I haven’t done it since it is so it’s a website where people offer up their couch for free in exchange for just a good hang really like someone to meet who’s who’s foreign who’s travelling through and you’re supposed to kind of do like, you know, cook your local food for them or you know, exchange something but everything’s for free.

 

Bryn 

Which more than a Jetson

 

Allie Delury 

yeah and it’s something that really died off after Airbnb came about because then people were like, well I can just rent out my couch and make money yeah, so I’m going to do that instead. So the the network died quite a bit but we met this guy. This indian guy named Kartik on it who took us in Super last minute

 

Pat Bonner 

he was new to Melbourne we were new to Melbourne, Melbourne and you baby just cool.

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah, we like slept on his floor. He looked in this like high rise apartment. He had a beautiful view of the city and it was just like amazing. He was like an angel he truly like saved

 

Pat Bonner 

got us out of a that that work away thing was was was almost abusive. We’re almost like indentured Urban snare. We’re like Okay, we got to get out of here. Yeah, Arctic came to the rescue.

 

Allie Delury 

Amazing. We stayed for like a couple days and just enough to buy the van. But then we also met a Scottish comedian in Adelaide who our very first night in Adelaide. We did he did the comedy show we had a couple beers with him and he’s like, why don’t you stay the night at my place? Like I usually Airbnb it out anyway, you guys are cool if you need a place to crash and he let us stay for like a week.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yeah. Yeah, right on the beach with great, great fellow Scottish dude named bass, bass.

 

Allie Delury 

So it’s just we’ve just been blown away by what we’ve met and the generosity and people who like bass, the Scottish guy he had done band life before so he was kind of just paying it forward. He was like I know where you guys are what you’re doing what you’re going through and I know I would have appreciated this and I’ve been going around the country so here you go like places yours I was like this is unbelievable.

 

Pat Bonner 

Go to a go to a stand up show. They’re like rap I notebook and they’re like you have to talk to me. This guy, you got to go to this place, you got to check this dude out, contact this person and then and then they set you up for the whole week and you’re like, Okay, I got on now I have plans every night. Yeah. Which is pretty cool.

 

Bryn 

And then selling it about just sort of, you know, if you were back at home, you’d be making it happen and control and enforcing the shit out of life. Yes, there’s certain amount of surrender alone. Yeah, and just trusting and allowing the generosity of others.

 

Pat Bonner 

It’s just being open to that, I think is it’s really been the difference. We’ve been open and they’ve people have really stepped up and helped when we’ve needed it. And even when we happen, people have been pretty great.

 

Bryn 

Yeah.

 

Allie Delury 

Well, I mean, back home you have so much more you have a roof over your head. You have a network of friends, you have a jobs you don’t really need or seek out any of that extra stuff. You’re not looking for extra friends. You’re not looking for things. do on the weekend because you have friends that have plans to invite you out. So when you give all of that up, and you’re just vulnerable, and it’s literally just you and a vehicle and you don’t know where you’re going, and you don’t know where you’re staying every night, I think I mean, you just you have to be open to all of that, because I mean,

 

Bryn 

vast ocean of possibility and probability.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yeah, you just find that people are pretty cool. You know, people are pretty awesome.

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah.

 

Allie Delury 

That’s been super cool to see that all firsthand.

 

Bryn 

So this isn’t just a swamp, how you’re doing content creation, you’re being a stand up comic. That’s right. I’m even more about the content creation. And is that actually earning you some money while you travel?

 

Allie Delury 

It is Yeah, it’s crazy. Um, content creation is actually a kind of a new career. When I went to college, I wasn’t taking courses on content creation. So it’s essentially now anybody With photo video editing background, so anything that you can sell to a company to exist on something like social media that they can promote, whatever. So in the past, I used to do like photo journalism. So usually you’re employed with a newspaper and you take photos for this newspaper and you read articles for the newspaper, it’s just you’re employed by one entity. But now because everything is just so fluid, and it doesn’t really matter where photo comes from anymore. Companies that whether it’s selling a product or like a travel company like Tastemade travel, they just want people to create content for them, doesn’t matter. They don’t have to be employed with that organisation. They can just say, Hey, I like your work. I want you to make a video on this, this and this that we’re going to use to promote our brand. So it’s just now become like a pool like everyone else in the same pool. You don’t really you’re not employed with an organisation Unless you’re really really, really good, like a repeat, whatever. So, um, so I started doing actual content creation right after I got out of the military. I got hired for like a four month gig with a company called Semester at Sea. And it’s a programme that sales around the world and it’s open the college students based in the US, but open to anybody’s anyone can apply and do just a Semester at Sea. So I was the lead photographer for that I was in charge of all their social media. So I was literally just hired for the four months to create as much travel content in whatever capacity i thought was appropriate. So photos, videos, social media, snacks, whatever. So now there’s like a real boom for that and there’s been a real rise in creatives they call themselves now. So like Tastemade travel, I got hired on as a freelance filmmaker for them in July. And it’s awesome that they pay me perfect Do and if it’s something that they like, they’ll pay me if it’s something they don’t like, you know, I don’t get paid. So it has to be good. Like it has to be. Oh, yeah, for sure, for sure. And I haven’t actually dealt with that. I mean, that’s the risk with freelancers is because you’re not actually employed because you’re not working by the hour, like everything has to be your best like, and there’s, you’re competing with yourself constantly because you’re like, I want to get paid. So this has to be good. Like I have to make this good. So that’s been super flexible, because basically what I do is I just pitch ideas along our route, the places that we’ve been that I think they’d be interested in covering, and if they greenlight it, then I go, I shoot it, I do all the coordination, and I produce a product and if they like it, they pay me. So that’s made us a little bit of money since being out here. But I also do social media management for various clients in the States. So these are just like startup companies. They’re all kind of fair trade. So Cuz that’s really big in America right now. So I just managed their social media accounts from over here. So I schedule all the content outside, it gets published at noon, Denver time or whatever, and I take content that already exists, and I just make it look pretty, like a social media grid. So has a lot of opportunities now to work abroad, which is awesome. And I’ve been trying to take as much opportunity as I can doing all that. So

 

Pat Bonner 

your last video got like two and a half million views?

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah, like right when 7 million Yeah, I’m candy cane. So you know, so it’s random. Like it’s candy cane factory. Yeah, back in the suit.

 

 

Yeah, it’s crazy. Oh, yeah.

 

Allie Delury 

So so that’s been really good for us. Just in financing the trip along the way and, and getting just better at the thing that I love to do, which is creating content,

 

Bryn 

like how you because think about it. You are doing your job wherever you go in the maze that you got yours committed. Yes. listener on. Whereas used to doing a job this located in America, but you’re doing it remotely.

 

Allie Delury 

Yes. This is kind of cool. Yeah.

 

Allie Delury 

It’s awesome. Like the flexibility is crazy. Like sometimes we spend a whole day in a cafe and I just work for like eight hours straight, just doing everything. And then that way, the next couple days, we don’t have to do anything at all. We can just travel and have fun. And so it’s just crazy flexible, and it allows us to, to really do the things that we want to do. And we imagined to do some cool stuff because of that. Yeah, like we went to an oyster farm and coffee day we did shark diving and port Lincoln. Sea Lion diving. We climbed the Adelaide Oval. Yeah, if you can do that, you can just like walk. Yeah. So we’ve just had a good time and it’s stuff that we would be doing anyway if you’re here so we’re able to do it. For a heavy heavy discount in exchange for content

 

Bryn 

Yeah. So stand up comedian. Yes. That start while you’re in the forces

 

Pat Bonner 

right after so yeah. being in the military that kind of station you away from anything cool. So what was this like a young to ya know so. So I’ve always I mean I’ve always thought I’ve just kind of funny and I’ve always been a huge stand up comedy fan so as soon as the opportunity presented itself I moved from upstate New York where there’s nothing funny at all to Colorado where they had like a pretty vibrant comedy scene, and alley kind of therapy. She’s like, well, you keep talking about it bunch of go up. See if you like it. Totally.

 

Pat Bonner 

Love it. Yeah, for sure.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yeah. And I gave it a try. I loved it. I bombed my first time but you know, it was a little bit delusional thinking I should still do it. And I’ve been doing it ever since as many as many times as I can a week. Getting up. I’m going Yes, a little bit of when you do well, and you hear the crowd laughing consistently the laughing hard. I don’t know if there’s a better feeling than that. Yeah, there’s just a you own it. It’s it’s the best you feel like the man, you know. So there’s definitely this. That’s the self gratification. I like making people laugh to that to me. There’s nothing better. So being around funny people is it’s awesome. It’s just a very good byproduct of a fun hobby. have yet to

 

Bryn 

transition your act, Australia.

 

Pat Bonner 

I’m a little I find it’s you can you can poke fun at being American like there’s like aspects that you can just shine that wouldn’t work. Being in America so I can make fun of Americans at large and that’s that seems to be Yeah, probably maybe hackish. I don’t know if attack is I think, I think I’ve got a decent perspective. But it’s I can taper it to that so I can juxtapose Australian life to what I found in American and vice versa and that works pretty well. Oh my god, I gotta punch that word pretty well, but here’s I guess a quick one. I just started wearing flip flops for the first time in like 30 years. My feet are free. I’m calling them my Nelson Mandela’s

 

Pat Bonner 

so that’s just a quick hitter. A little wordplay Australia is like wordplay. Yeah, usually though, someone screams out from the crowd stones. The cold thongs Yeah, just like All right, here we go.

 

Bryn 

Yeah. Yes. Yeah. There you go. And as you said earlier on this is this is pick it up and you’re getting suggestions and you get the opportunity to

 

Pat Bonner 

Yeah, so the more I do it, I’ve been doing it for a bunch of years. So I’m not I’m not bad at it. I’m not a new, you know, I know how to handle a crowd. I know how to handle myself. I’ve got a lot of material. So just coming into a new place is really the only daunting thing coming into like going from Melbourne to Adelaide, you gotta break into that scene and every scene is territorial. You know, everybody, everybody doesn’t want an outsider coming in if especially Who’s this new guy, I’ve never seen him before he hasn’t. He hasn’t hit every single open mic or every single show. So they, they’re resistant to just putting you on unless you’re a travelling comedian with credentials, and you’ve, you’ve opened for big people or you are a big name. So like breaking into a new scene, every time we travel is that’s that’s probably the biggest challenge or the biggest hurdle, but it only takes one show. And then they’re like, Oh, this person knows what they’re doing. Go to this person, you know, talk to this person about getting booked here. Go to this place, show up sign up here sign a Facebook group that we’re all part of so soon as you do well and they realise that you’re not some chump moving in on their territory or their gigs or taken you know, taken opportunity away from them extremely helpful, but I found that every comedy scene is very consistently territorial. Yeah, which is kind of fun. Yeah,

 

Allie Delury 

I do. Yeah, I probably shouldn’t because open mics are just a place to test out your material. So it’s not like the highest quality is like a showcase like I mean cuz it’s usually just yeah it’s in a room and people are just trying out new stuff so it sometimes it works sometimes it doesn’t. But I honestly I love it. I’ve learned so much about comedy. I didn’t know anything before Pat started doing comedy I didn’t even really watch comedians yet. But we’ve we’ve gone to live shows with like big names. We’ve been able to obviously travel a whole bunch and do it and even though I’ve heard all of his jokes million times, I still love seeing the audience react to it. I love seeing, you know, the other comedians and what they have in common is just so I don’t know like, it’s surprising because I would think that there would be less than less to talk about with comedy like oh, that jokes already been used to talk Topics already been talked about by this person like and yeah, but every time I go somewhere, there’s just a new way to look at things that someone introduces me to whether it’s Pat or another comedian where I’m like, that is so cool. That’s so funny. And I never thought of it that way. And I never would have thought of it had I not gotten.

 

Pat Bonner 

It’s all different perspectives. You see. Like, I think Dave Chappelle said recently when he accepted some award, he’s like, every voice there is is represented in comedy, every viewpoint somebody has on stage and like, the more you see comedy, the more you realise That’s true. There’s Yeah, it’s a tonnes of different perspectives and like the comedians generally challenged themselves to find new unique takes on old subject. So you see a lot of different A lot of it fails. You know, there’s a lot that is not funny, but there’s a lot to respect about people just getting up there and you’re I understand

 

Bryn 

it again. It’s human being standing up there on a stage talking to other human beings. Yes as as the podcast goes longer the guy who Paul Carter who’s just it’s just for stores for services let a fantastic life and so it was options to sit and listen and I grew up with my dad and his friends and their rooms become Jags and you know kind of pub and listen to Joe tell stories and I just thought this is one of the key things that men do is contact stories and tell jokes and neck joke seem to be and for listeners who obviously so do is I’m just do this fight which is picking up my iPhone and going through this one yeah and then you go oh yeah that’s probably and and there is no telling you there is no sexual interaction. It’s me just sharing

 

Pat Bonner 

Yeah, there’s no craft to it. There’s no personality

 

Bryn 

beyond Oh, yes. drawer and then just the last minute changing the definition word.

 

 

Yeah.

 

 

That’s really funny.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yeah. You find though that like people are drawn to personality so they’re like the truer a person is on stage. to themselves, like, the more the audience will buy in, you can tell them putting someone’s putting up a facade, you know, when someone’s demonstrating false confidence, or even like worse, false modesty, you know, like they, like the crowd will ditch you very quickly, if you aren’t striving to be the closest version of yourself there. And so they can, they can, the crowd can smell dishonesty. And so it really forces you to get to know yourself, really take a hard audit of who you are, and bring that person to the stage. That’s the biggest challenge comedy.

 

Bryn 

And I’ve committed

 

Pat Bonner 

to do to do yeah, I mean, where we decided to double down on on what we assess. We’re good at so far enough to really find out whether that’s true or not. Yes,

 

Bryn 

yes. Yes. As opposed to just cruising through the thin veneer of life and challenge.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yes, exactly. Yeah. We’re putting ourselves through the crucible I just said yeah, so you also do a podcast? Yeah, we do. What’s it called? called workout away. And it’s a documents our adventure travel through Australia but eventually beyond kind of my life through comedy your life through content creation and our life together through our relationship. Yeah, so we’ve tried to leave no stone unturned. I think we’re getting better and better at that as our episodes go on. So

 

 

why do

 

Pat Bonner 

this good question.

 

Allie Delury 

That’s a really good question. Why did we do?

 

Pat Bonner 

Well, I mean, because we, we want to show how big and fun The world is. And we want to like, the problems we have, I think in our relationship, not that they’re huge problems are insurmountable problems and not to dwell on the problems but like, I think are shared by people. You know, I think our perspective as unique as it is, is something that is relatable and I think is that it helps me get closer to my comedy, helps me get closer to the person I want to be on stage but it helps me get closer to you. And I think the more honest we are, like I said, people are drawn to that. And I think we wanted to challenge ourselves creatively. At least I did.

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah. Well, it also is convenient. Because people already were like, you guys are going to Australia, you’re gonna be doing so much cool stuff. Where can we follow that? Like, are you guys going to be blogging? Are you guys going to be dealing like giving us updates every month, like what? And so I think this helps our families stay remotely same, so they could tune in every week and hear what’s going on. But, you know, regardless of what happens on this trip, it’ll be nice and like 510 years to listen back on these episodes, and literally of Australia, because so much gets forgotten in the day to day. There’s so many trips that I’ve taken throughout my life where I’m like, I didn’t document any of it. And now I can’t remember anything. I don’t remember who I met where I went, like, I just I wish I had something solid that I could look back on whether it was a journal or a blog or podcast will take you straight back. Yeah, exactly.

 

Bryn 

Since you say that because blog but when when I travelled obviously do a seminar. I spoke I think he was only in

 

 

South America

 

Bryn 

and that was right at the end of the travel right and and said my parents were in fact, parents are here from England that they’re already talking the other day about. Mom was talking about how literally would be every two to three weeks she’d get like a quick phone call from me from South America. Hi, yeah.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yes.

 

Bryn 

Just for the next two three weeks. Yeah. And then she literally just have to let me go. Yeah, absolutely go

 

Pat Bonner 

it’s a different time. Did you prefer that when you travel? Or do you like the the interconnectedness

 

Bryn 

as well question because I think it’s interesting because when you You guys talk about the actually having the conversations and recording them on the podcast. To me, that’s a real intangible, obviously. But to me, I think there’s a real power in that. And that’s like real authentic. It’s everything counts. Yeah, look, I just had this for breakfast in Sri Lanka. I’ve just had this for breakfast in Hawaii, dah dah dah, dah, dah. You know, it’s not really do. Yeah, yeah, I remember the first time I went to Bombay in 1994. And it’s not here. It’s first by sit some come up in the whole Australia, and everyone’s there. And they’ve got cameras with films, and taking the picture. The camera was just hitting it this guy was gonna make a mental note to Byron only four months ago, for the first time since not to say that I can still to this day remember that picture my job better Rubick conscious effort to Yes, but yeah, so I think there’s a real balance between over blood sharing, like just shit. Yes. Look at me, is this incredible waterfall? Was that me? Like, really? You went to the waterfall and you had that picture? And right and then it just says pictures taking your life.

 

Pat Bonner 

Right? It’s just photo op.

 

Bryn 

Yes. Yeah. And that that gives me the shoes. Yes. And the actual journey, I still have travel journals. And sometimes when I want to access some great part of myself will say different. Unless you’re reading for sure. Wow. Yes. Right. And then what you’re doing is the next level up, which is we’re going to record conversations and things that are coming up for us.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yeah, what’s been the reception of a overwhelmingly positive more the more wrong we keep it like the more honest we are in our travels like we We had that episode where I talked about my depression and our time apart and all of that. And we got really good feedback on that. I was worried right before we put it out. And so I go, I don’t I don’t know how this is going to be received, you know, I start getting butterflies about it. And the feedback was overwhelmingly positive. People still kind of write me and say, Well, thanks. Thanks for that episode. I didn’t know you’re going through that. Or the other john. Hey, I know we’re not in your circle, but feel free to reach out if you’re ever feeling that way is like wow, people. that resonates with people. Yeah. Being open, honest. being real, I think is really what the what it comes down to is if you’re not putting on a facade people, people will be drawn to that.

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah, exactly. Totally agree.

 

Bryn 

I found that the more selfish and more selfish like, like this. I really want to talk to this person about this and I will ask questions on it. And then Yeah, interesting. Curiosity lab This is exploratory and expensive.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yes, absolutely. The the fewer veneers there are between you and the people that you’re trying to talk to the better.

 

Bryn 

Yeah now. And, you know, when I say selfie, sometimes I have the conversations that I want, and I capture them and if everybody else listens to and enjoys it, then

 

Pat Bonner 

that’s it. That’s great. And that

 

Bryn 

in and of itself becomes even more.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yes, absolutely. And people are drawn to enthusiasts, you know, that’s magnetic motivated people motivate people and there’s the athletic people influence people

 

Bryn 

yeah. So switching tack now I read silly ages ago and it’s probably completely untrue but it says it like such a small percentage of Americans actually have passports. And, and because of that, we don’t really see many of them travel. And then there’s a thing about you so much in America that you just travel inside of it anyway. So you know, That’s true. You guys are kind of rare in the fact that you’ve left the shows in America. Yeah. And

 

Pat Bonner 

so what? How do you find Australians receiving yours Americans are pretty good with the exception of like, leaving America this time is it’s kind of welcome because everything’s so politically divided. You know, you can’t get away from politics in america. Yeah. Come into us. Kind of except there’s a there’s like a sect of Australians that want to talk to us about American politics. Yeah, exactly. That we get that question. Yes. Well, yeah. Yeah. Well, I mean, not that we’re fans of them. But you know, that we don’t care to talk about politics. We’ve, we’re happy to leave that back in America for dumb people to argue, you know, we’re, we have no desire to do that. And I found that but I guess I’m more just kind of hacky comedians, who will come up to us and say, Oh, yeah, did those Donald Trump Joe Sedgefield other than the fact that I’ve heard them before. Yeah, I’m fine with them. I don’t care, you know. So that’s, that’s kind of what I’ve found is people are very welcoming to us. they’ve treated us pretty well, outside of the rare political talk. It’s been great.

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah, I think most of it is just genuine curiosity, because some of the work that I do still with the military as a reservist is back in the UK, actually. And I was there when Boris Johnson was elected and Brexit, all that stuff going on. And I think it’s natural to have an opinion about something that is just so crazy, and something that you don’t see very often. And I think that’s okay, that’s tolerable In my opinion, where people are like, Oh, my gosh, this is happening. This is what I’ve heard. This is true, whatever. It’s the people who think that they know more, or what to do better, that talk to you about it, or they’re like, like, why That’s where it gets a little irritating because then it doesn’t really matter if it’s Trump or democrats or whoever is policy. Now it just feels like you’re just talking shit about America. Yeah. And that kind of feels like okay, well, I’m still American, you know, I might not support X, Y and Z but like, I mean, come on country and if you talk shit about I’m gonna defend it or

 

Bryn 

Yeah, yeah. Have you since in your time here in Australia have you taken you learn stuff about Australia and Australia culture do you think? I think

 

Pat Bonner 

I think the willingness to engage in any conversation or just like throw throw a line to somebody that you just see that I miss I didn’t realise I missed that if it everywhere I’ve been still feels kind of like a small town. People are willing to engage with you. Even if it’s just walking by throw your job throw your line. I remember we were at the library and this woman librarian was reaching across the just some metal bar to toss a book to a guy who would ask for it. And she tosses it. And it was the kind of a throw when a scan and the guide missed the catch. And she just looks amigos. It was just shake throw, but it was also a shake, catch. And you know, like I was just like, Oh my God, that’s great. She didn’t have to engage with me on that. I was just sitting there watching the interaction. And she just threw a line my way. And I was like, that kind of stuff. So it’s Yeah, it’s got a warmer field personality wise. So I think I’ll bring a lot more of that back open the way so

 

Allie Delury 

oh my gosh, I don’t know. Oh, I can tell you what has been frustrating about the culture

 

Allie Delury 

is so like basic and like, people are gonna listen and be like, Oh, really. But we came to Australia under the assumption that the coffee here was going to be four and I worked at Starbucks like, we love Coffee we drink it every day. Yeah, so I was like I’m so excited for this coffee I’ll tell you what the coffee here not great

 

Pat Bonner 

not great you can’t just get a just a cup of drip coffee just normal run of the mill can’t find it.

 

Allie Delury 

No they’re very judgmental if you ask they’re like in Starbucks we asked for coffee and they’re like well we’re gonna have to heat up a whole batch because no one orders that are you sure that’s what you want like not saying that directly but basically saying that like okay, we have to make fresh fresh batch but know that the coffee here is just like americanos like the espresso with water. Which is I don’t know it’s it’s interesting is different and I was just like, Oh man, I was so looking forward to good coffee and I just

 

Allie Delury 

like where where do you guys where’s the shit coffee that we

 

Allie Delury 

deal with like, Where is that give that.

 

Bryn 

Coffee turkeys disappeared and it’s this level of 10

 

Pat Bonner 

definitely has if it doesn’t have foam didn’t take 10 minutes to make it sound drink the coffee smart work.

 

 

Yeah, I

 

Pat Bonner 

don’t want to do it like a leaf. I wanted to just be dark black and so I can drink it stay awake. Wait, yeah, that’s what I want. Excellent.

 

Bryn 

Yeah. So. So that’s kind of brings me to why. Yes. So with my podcast often I ask people about, you know, what was it like growing up in Australia? What did you come here to do? And that’s usually where the first questions I ask out of the box. Okay. Excellent. So yeah, you know, it is who grew so that the reason why I call it that is a real conversations. We’re having a daughter who and I’m always intrigued to understand people’s view and stuff like that. And you know, since you’ve been in this enormous past isolated stack. Tell me about the five to 10 minute things that you’ve noticed. You want to go

 

Allie Delury 

first. Sure, well Good, bad, indifferent, perfect, you’ll get all of it. So we were not initially going to come to Perth for a while, I think our original route we were going to start in Melbourne, and then go east. But we had to register the van and South Australia. So we had to go to Adelaide. And we were only going to be in Adelaide for a little bit. But then we met Baz he was extremely kind and gave us crazy good hospitality on the beach. So we stayed longer. But he was the one who actually recommended like, hey, due to the weather, it might be in your best interest to go west, and then maybe come back around and then do the East Coast last.

 

Pat Bonner 

And we’re like, Okay, well, there’s Yeah, good. Good advice.

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah. So so we headed out this way. And it was, you know, the South Australia ends with the Nullarbor essentially. So it was like this literal and figurative just like brand new, like you crossing the border into West Australia. And it’s just like, you start to see trees and you start to see vegetation and Animals and then you get to our first real stop was an Esperance. Yeah. And it was like the most beautiful beach we’ve seen since coming here. And we’ve tried to go to a lot like an Adelaide area and Melbourne, and we were just so blown away. We’re like we this is gorgeous. And then we got to Perth and it’s just it’s so different. Mostly in a good way just because it’s so isolated. Yeah, I feel like you don’t get the pretentious city folk here that you might get and some of the more populated areas. Like Melbourne was a little more rigid and hard and kind of like New York or Chicago back in the States. Uh, Perth is just so like, calm. I’ve just felt nothing but calm since being here and it’s just even the downtown area. We’ve only spent a little bit of time there but it’s just like everyone just is like breathing here. Everyone’s just like it’s quiet. Yes, yes. Which is I mean, that was my first impression. That’s a good first impression. A mine we came over the Nullarbor. We press it to Norsemen, and there was a huge storm that we drove through. Lightning everywhere gigantic rain. Fatty our our bus out there are little our van

 

Pat Bonner 

trudged along, there was a lightning bolt that struck like, I don’t know, 20 metres away we saw the explosion like loud thunder. So we made it into Western Australia was like, it was a test it felt like it was like all right, we gotta earn this. And so we made it. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, most people die on this road. So we made it. We get to aspirants the water was unreal. Blew, you know, danger sharks. Gorgeous dolphins pitching themselves out of the waves. It was it felt like we just gotten to like a place that nobody talks about. Like they should surprise nobody was recommending this place to us. We stumbled upon it, that seems odd, you know, and then we pressed it over to Perth. And it’s been pretty good. You know, we’ve been incognito camping, we’ve found some great spots to stay and the comedy scene has recently become welcoming, like I said, had to get over those territorial roadblocks, but it’s been great. Once I got over kind of David had was a little mad about how the comedy scene was going. I was trying to contact all the Booker’s and it was kind of giving me the cold shoulder they didn’t know who I was or what I was doing. But I got on one show and I think dominoes had fallen from there. So I got a show last night that was in Pasadena, Pasadena, Otello, it was wild show a lot of hecklers. Tonight, I’ll be at the Fremantle comedy factory. So they did so it’s all starting to fall into place things are welcoming as they as I thought they would be. Instead you heard they’d be so I guess that was the bad mixed with the good. There was a little little standoffish comedy wise, but they didn’t They’ve seemed to come around, which is pretty cool.

 

Bryn 

Notice the space and isolation?

 

Pat Bonner 

Yes, absolutely. I think at least I did comedy wise. I think not a lot of people get out this way. So I think some of the the machinations or the architecture that that you see, do you find a little bit easier if you go to a city where the Booker’s who do I contact for this gig Do you get they get back to you quick. They know that there’s like a rotation of comics that they book up fast with a book far in advance where they have spots open for people coming through. It’s like this place is so isolated, that those aren’t set up those wheels aren’t greased, and this is often

 

Allie Delury 

Is there like a rivalry between like Perth, and some of the East Coast cities kind of like there is with LA and New York.

 

Bryn 

And I’d say the most of most of the East Coast, we carry on and not really neither here Really don’t know that we’re here. Right? And less like the world to start coming into the budget. And then from our point of view it’s interesting to ask me because I come from the UK so I know what a big old sit proper looking city looks like with London, right? Melbourne. It’s just all dirty and it just doesn’t have the history to back up being like that. Everyone’s all about the coffee scene and the food scene and yeah, okay, that whenever I’ve gone to Melbourne This reminds me of all the reasons why I left a man cloud code is really silly so wrong. I now have a challenge with going to the cities now because I live in such an isolated place with a Turner like all that nervous systems firing off but that’s me and I yeah, look, there is. There is you know if it comes to Australian Rules, football You know, that there is but it’s, it’s, if anything, it’s probably going to be more like the East Coast doesn’t really notice the West Coast or the west coast is probably gotcha.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yeah. Little Brother syndrome. Yeah.

 

Bryn 

When I just say. Yeah, yeah. So yes. So you’ve been on the tour, so far, two months. And we talked a lot about lots of different things. So one of the questions I got for both of you individually is what have you learned today so far?

 

Pat Bonner 

Oh, my God, that I need adventure that I thought I thought I wanted it. I think I just need it. I think I need I need to challenge myself. And if I’m not challenging myself, then I feel stagnant and I that I dislike it

 

Pat Bonner 

and this district has been very fulfilling.

 

 

No, yeah, no.

 

Bryn 

It was that question was consistent

 

Pat Bonner 

and in questions. Such a good question though.

 

Bryn 

Yeah, give me a quick bit of time.

 

Allie Delury 

Um, let’s see, what am I learned about myself? I mean, I guess just personally, I’m just within our relationship and within the constraints of the van, to just communicate better. You don’t realise unless you’re living 24 seven with someone else, how often you need to communicate and be direct about your needs and when you need time or whatever. So for me personally, I’ve that’s been a wake up call in terms of Okay, like I I need to get better at that personally. Yeah, you know, cuz it’s so easy if you’re not uncomfortable in a hot sweaty band to, you know, make assumptions about what the other person wants or what you want. And so just being in those uncomfortable situations, long drives or whatever, being able to talk about stuff outright and not let it fester within yourself for hours and hours and hours on the road like that, that is something that I’ve been trying to do better at very much learned about myself that I’ve just never been challenged in that way before. I’ve never really been forced to think about my problems and past problems in that way. So it’s, that’s something I’ve learned about myself. But I think I think additionally, this is, I mean, this is just a crazy adventure and a crazy thing that we’re doing and we we don’t know where we’re going to be in a month and a week and a day, and that forces you to just kind of go with the flow a lot more. And for me, I I used to be kind of a list person, not really rigid because this is generally how I like to travel. But I think trusting the journey is something that I’ve had to kind of learn to do, at least in the beginning because I’ve been there was just so much flexibility and so much that could go right and go wrong. And being able to just be okay with both sides of that is something that I think I’ve gotten decent up and that I’ve learned about myself, my kind of boring, but that’s

 

Bryn 

nice. So I believe sometimes, you know, things are you’re doing certain things that I’ve done in my life that have had some big undertakings. The real reason for why you do them won’t become apparent until probably 612 18 months after you’ve done so finish. Yeah, but already part of the reason why you’re doing this will probably be starting to reveal itself. So, why Why are you doing this?

 

Pat Bonner 

I needed I needed to get out from from the cycle that I was in. I didn’t like my job. I was starting to go down that that stagnant path. And I knew that I couldn’t, I couldn’t keep doing that something had to break and leaving the job trying to pursue something that I that I wanted that I loved, seemed to be the right answer with the person that I loved with with Ali support. And with her by my side, we’ve done the distance saying we’ve been together we did the distance, together distance, and this just seemed like a way to lock in both alley next to me, and go forward on what it is I wanted to do. So it seemed that that’s that seems to be a parent that that’s that is working and that’s starting. Why Yo, what is the real purpose?

 

Allie Delury 

Well, it’s so funny. Yeah, well, so a lot of people have asked that question, why are you doing this? And

 

Bryn 

I’m asking what, as you get further into the real purpose will become more and more apparent, right? What What does it feel like to you at this point?

 

Allie Delury 

Okay, goodness. Um, I mean, I’ve always existed in a mindset where I should never really ask why I should just say, why not and jump in. Because people, they frame the question as if you’re going to fail, right? Like, why would you do this? Because what if it all goes wrong? And I kind of I try to think of it as why wouldn’t I do it? Because what if it all goes right? And so if it all goes right for us, is you know, we have a podcast that is successful, that is real that resonates with people. I get good at doing the thing that I love the most, which is creating content and doing that 24 seven whenever I want. In a space where it’s okay to fail. And wherever we go after this, you know, when we move back to New York or whatever travel we do from here on out, whatever I’ve learned in this year about both myself, Pat and what I want to do. I mean, that’s like you said, that’s when it will become apparent. Yeah, but I don’t. I don’t know. I guess I don’t really have a good answer for that. And

 

Pat Bonner 

I’ve seen our podcast start to take a bigger priority. You know, like, I find that to be something I didn’t realise just going to be creatively stimulating and satisfying. I think both for me and I won’t speak for you, but you seem to be enjoying it. You know, we’re, we’re building content for the podcast. We’re like engaging with our listeners. And it’s, it’s something I didn’t expect. So it’s a that kind of surprises me a bit.

 

Bryn 

Yeah. And what role is Australia platinum, this

 

Pat Bonner 

I guess kind of an Like a muse, if you will, it’s just a it’s a setting its backdrop, its flavour. It’s, it’s just kind of a kick in the ass that we needed to start it all kind of a safe space. I’m running out of analogies for it, but it’s just a it’s the place that we’ve found a solid enough footing for us to jump into, at least for me the things that I love.

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah. I mean, everyone talks about Australia and the outback. And they’re like, Oh, it’s so vast and so open. And I think that’s a good analogy for why this is a good setting is because it is so open. And so we have room to fail here. We have room to really explore the things that we want to do. We have room to meet people we would have never met anywhere else in the world. And so there’s a lot of parallels with that in terms of what we’re trying to accomplish with not only this journey, this temporary journey, but like our life journey together. And I think that’s awesome.

 

Bryn 

There you go. You bet. Question.

 

Pat Bonner 

Great answer. Yeah.

 

Bryn 

So last couple of questions, what sort of things to you to do in life to keep you sort of same grounded, healthy measure.

 

Pat Bonner 

So we work out, go for runs, sometimes we’ll do that together for if we need a moment, we’ll just kind of run as fast as we can in opposite directions. And then be back at the van. Yeah. But we’re, that’s a that’s a big one.

 

Pat Bonner 

Reading of crushed a bunch of books while I’ve been out here,

 

Allie Delury 

I read a book since I was like 12. And I just finished a book recently, although we cannot see that’s a huge reader. So he’s inspired me to kind of explore that part of me that I haven’t touched in so long. But podcasts other

 

Pat Bonner 

Oh, yeah, listening to podcast just, I like driving. You know, it’s kind of like doing Man, this just for whatever reason satisfies my brain and my tactile skills feels like I’m playing a video game with higher stakes. Yeah.

 

Allie Delury 

Um, oh goodness. Honestly, reading is a brand new hobby. I got a whole bunch of books we just got on.

 

Allie Delury 

It is I know, it’s so silly to say out loud it was 30 like, it shouldn’t be brand new, but it is. So I’m excited to explore that a little bit and figure out what kind of stuff I like to read. Um, honestly, I know I’ve said it a million times but creating content a full time I’ve never been able to do that. I’ve always had one foot in a job somewhere else or I’m doing something different, something that’s more secure that brings in more money. So just getting weird with Premiere Pro and video editing and figuring out how to make something look super appealing even if it maybe was it. I mean, that’s just that’s what I love to do. I love to edit photos. Yeah, I just I love that. And I get to do that all the time now in the van when we’re on the road. It’s so that’s just been really, really cool for me. Cool.

 

Bryn 

Yeah. So the last question I was asked my guess

 

Pat Bonner 

is

 

Bryn 

if you could tell you to a little nugget of information and upload it into the collective consciousness, so everyone’s got it.

 

Pat Bonner 

had a very good question. little nugget.

 

Bryn 

Yeah, yeah. Oh, yeah. Yeah. So if you could just take a little nugget.

 

Allie Delury 

I would say what we’re doing right now has blown so many people’s minds. So many people are like, Oh, my God, you’re doing what? I can’t believe it and they always end up the same. They say I could never do that. I could never do that because I have money. issues. I have a house here, I have family, I have all this other stuff. And they just come up with a million excuses on why they could never do what we’re doing. So I guess if I could put one little nugget of information and everyone’s brain, it’s that what we’re doing is not that hard. Truly. Like, it’s daunting, for sure. It can be stressful at times. But you can just pick up and do the thing that you’ve always wanted to do. The only person holding you back is always you. And I never really understood that until I like touched down here and was like, wow, we did it. We did it. And people said that we couldn’t people said that we shouldn’t. And it honestly wasn’t as bad as I thought it was going to be. You know, it was just you, you save up money. You get your assets in order. If you plan on coming back, and you just go and I think people are still under this impression that travel is like daunting and expensive and like just crazy difficult to do. And it’s not and it’s more accessible now. than it ever was in anyone’s life. And I just I think more people need to hear that

 

Pat Bonner 

low. Yeah. All right, my turn. We I guess my my points tangentially related but a very famous American writer Mark Twain said the antidote to prejudice is travel. So the more you see, the more you understand. People are people. And I think the world needs a bit more of that as we become more connected through the internet and through all the social media, all these things it seems like we’re getting further and further apart. We’re getting diametrically opposed when when the truth is probably we all kind of feel that and and think very similar to each other. And we have a lot more in common than we have differences even with the person who’s on the opposite side of the world. So it’s a if you can’t travel, just understand that people are people.

 

Allie Delury 

Yeah, that’s why it’s so cool to like, see you do comedy and Travel and do comedy, because the common denominator with everyone no matter where they’re from is laughter you’ll just love to laugh no matter what. And that’s just been so cool to see as a bystander to Pat’s hobby is just seeing like everyone’s face light up, wherever you go, if you can tell a joke and make someone’s day and make someone laugh and, and take all these things that we put up here in terms of seriousness, and really, like, bring it down a notch and show that it’s not it’s not that serious. Yeah, exactly like that. That is really cool to see

 

Pat Bonner 

not over flayed, like kind of a trivial thing, like stand up, but laughter is a human language. You know, I think shared by every culture. Yeah. That’s cool.

 

Bryn 

Guys, thank you so much for taking the time. Thank you for having us. It’s been an absolute blast. Awesome. And if people want to track your journey, where can they find you?

 

Pat Bonner 

Instagram work our way to work our way podcasts and if they want to hit us up directly, they can contact us through our website work our way.com and work our way podcast at gmail. com.

 

Bryn 

Yeah. Excellent. Thanks so much taking the time.

 

Allie Delury 

No, yeah.

 

Pat Bonner 

Yeah, this has been great. Thank you. Thanks. Thanks.

 

SUMMARY KEYWORDS

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