#176 The Electric Universe – Wallace Thornhill

This week I had a great conversation about science, the natural beauty and purity of science and scientific investigation with Wallace Thornhill, Vice President of the Thunderbolts Project.

Wallace shares his paradigm changing Electrical Universe theory.

What makes this so interesting is that Wallace, and others, have conducted their research and exploration separate from the university infrastructure.

As well as expanding your understanding of the fabric of the universe, hopefully from this conversation you will be inspired to rethink your own relationship with science and consider your own scientific exploration and experimentation to further your own horizons rather than abrogating to University Scientists.

Read Full Transcript

Bryn Edwards 

This week had a great conversation about science, and natural beauty and purity of science and scientific investigation. With Wallace Thornhill. Now what is the vice president of the Thunderbolts Project. And in this we talk about his concept around the electrical universe. What makes this conversation so much fun and really enjoyable? And it’s a really delicate conversation is that what is done most of his research and and journeying and investigation and exploration outside of university. And what this conversation really I got from it was a real sort of falling back in love with science and how we can do our own little scientific experiments endeavours in our own garage, and investigate things for ourselves, rather than just leaving it to the scientists in universities with great letters after their name. So watch this. Enjoy this, and I’m really interested to see how you go with it. So enjoy Wallace.

 

Bryn Edwards 

Hello, and welcome back to WA Real. I’m your host, Bryn Edwards. WA Real holds the space to follow the oldest form of learning. I love listening to the stories and the experience of those around us. Why so we can explore these stories to find out our own truth and our own sense of self.

 

So today, we’re going to look at a completely new paradigm of how we look at the universe. And one that is approachable to all of us. We’re going to do that with my guest today. Wallace, Thornhill Wallace, welcome to the show.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

Thanks very much for the invitation Bryn.

 

Bryn Edwards 

Thank you. Thank you. So before we jump into the, what is the electrical universe? Can you give me just a quick precis of your of your background? Because that in and of itself is kind of interesting and raises some fun questions. Okay.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

Yeah. Well, I was born and bred in Melbourne, went to Melbourne University and completed a degree in science began. fourth year under Professor Victor hopper. And was partway through that year that I realised I had no hope of advancing in the academic world because I was asking questions that people didn’t like. And so I joined IBM as a scientific programmer, and then went on to become a systems engineer at the National University in Canberra. I was transferred up here, way back in 1967. At the time when the moon landings and everything were happening.

 

Bryn Edwards 

So did working for IBM, give me the opportunity to ask those questions.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

Well, I certainly interested some of the people who worked with me, they would ask me, why are you here? You know? Yeah, so mobile works good in the pies. Good, very interesting. I said, where I was going was going nowhere. Nobody was interested in what I was interested in.

 

Bryn Edwards 

What was that at that stage?

 

Wallace Thornhill 

Well, when I was at high school, this is back in the mid 50s. I, my father brought home a book. He was in and out of Heidelberg hospital. He was a TPI pensioner and he said, I think you might be interested in this book in yours very interested in astronomy. I used to memorise facts out of the encyclopaedia and bore the kids at school witless with recitation, recitations, one, the encyclopaedia but it was a manual velikovsky is worlds in collision. Right, had become a best seller for six months in New York on in think the New York Times bestseller. But, boy, it was certainly Yeah, through the cat amongst the pigeons, for the astronomers, in particular, Harlow Shapley, who was one of the leading astronomers of the day and he became, according to Fred Hoyle almost incoherent

 

Bryn Edwards 

right.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

Because, of course, as I’ve learned over the years, cosmology is just another form of religion. It’s right creation story. It’s miraculous, it has no relevance to physics at all. And of course, when I found out his work, he I realised later that he taught me how to do real science and that is the old classical way where you were trying all sorts of things. You have Latin history and the classics and all this kind of stuff. Nowadays, with specialisation, we are more or less brought up with complete tunnel vision.

 

Bryn Edwards    

Right.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

And so the experts that we have now we’ve sort of developed a cultural expert, called the expert, it’s called we sort of submitted to expert opinion, when in fact, their, their opinions are often very ill informed. Because they cannot see any kind of big picture. There is no University on earth that teaches the big picture, where it shows how everything fits together. And as a result, the science of today is incoherent. But all of these ideas, of course, many years later, came together because I just assumed my main interest. And that was to actually understand gabbled, explain what dilla kotsky had shown and that is that within human memory, not in historical times, his worlds in collision suggests that within human memory, mankind has witnessed some incredible things in the sky, including planets hurling thunderbolts as I call them, the Thunderbolts of the gods. Yeah. And apparently the earth was involved, to the extent that it created tremendous damage on earth, and traumatise the human race, those that survived. And we still have this kind of imprinted or what you might call a kind of instinctive inherited, post traumatic stress disorder, and a fear of Doomsday.

 

Bryn Edwards 

Yes,

 

Wallace Thornhill 

the end of the world. And you see it all the time. And fear is one of the biggest words that you’ll see used in newspapers and all that kind of thing in the media buying drives people to do things, because one of the key drivers of mankind,

 

Bryn Edwards 

yes.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

Now Carl Jung, famous psychoanalyst. Said as a result of his work, which was with thousands and thousands of psychiatric patients, that they all had these themes which kept coming through which he called an archetype of memory. Yes, the archetypes are all ones to do with this half remembered task, which we keep suppressing. And the problem there is velikovsky sort because he was a leading psychoanalyst and polymath, you might say, because he can, he covered the ground, he was a classical scholar.

 

Bryn Edwards 

Yes,

 

Wallace Thornhill 

he identified it, and said that it appears that we suffer from the kind of amnesia, the whole human race. Yes. And so he identified what Carl Jung had recognised, and also explained it, which was phenomenal, really. And that is that we, as amnesiacs have this subconscious memory of Doomsday, the end of the world and we’ll all die, we’ll all be judged. And, you know, watch out, watch out for the end of the world and the signs that it’s coming.

 

Bryn Edwards 

Yeah.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

And the problem with that kind of amnesia is that there is a tendency on the sufferer to want to subconsciously or to visit, revisit the events in a way, which is safe. So we have all these disaster movies. And we have these monster movies, you know, of Godzilla, and then these creatures that are so much more powerful than us, you know, the superheroes, and all this kind of stuff. And it’s throughout my life, I’ve met a number of things, which were then going to be the end of the world, first of all, is a nuclear winter. And then we’re going to have an ice age that was back in the 80s, I think it was, and then it was comet impact and spice God and all these kinds of things were set up. And people have forgotten about that. And now it’s global warming and the global pandemic. And this existential fear is a real problem. Because it, I think, is at the heart of our misunderstanding of religions. In fact, religions are not an answer to anything there the biggest question mark facing mankind, yes. What gave birth to them? And my colleague, Dave talman, who was an American, who I first met in 1974 and 20 years later in 1994, after he published a book called The second myth. Tara’s invited by him to come and speak at his first international meeting, where his film remembering the end of the world was premiered. And he at the time felt that this because it explains all of these subconscious memories. So that you said kind of identified. And it has a huge impact on people. He thought that it would go viral. And I’m pleased that didn’t because we were ill prepared at that stage to do anything with it. Yes. Anyway, after I saw his work, you might not remember we first met 20 years ago, at a conference in Canada. It was the first international velikovsky conference that’ll have cashed in insurance policies and everything here to go and see it. And but at that meeting, he was one of the people who was organising it, and really talked about, you know, all sorts of things other than you know, cabbages and kings, instead of what was really bugging us at the time. So in 99, in 1994, in Portland, Oregon, where this conference was held, I went up to him, caught up with him and lift actually at the hotel, and tell them we’ve met 20 years earlier, and he vaguely remembered it. And I said, I’ve seen your work, and I think we should work together. Now began an association that’s lasted ever since. And he when he began presenting his material after that, recognised that the common aspect between his research into the myths and legends around the world and the religions and creation myth, that the Thunderbolt was the thing that tried to do together because my work was called the Electric Universe. In fact, the very first time I presented it was two years later, I Camplin his office floor and all the rain dripped outside in Portland. For a month, before we had our first international meeting in Portland, Oregon, not in 97. So that was the start of really this whole thing. And it’s been a hell of an adventure. And yes,

 

Bryn Edwards 

the most interesting thing, just before we can move on any further, the interesting thing is that a lot of that was because you’re de shackled from the requirements of academia in universities.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

Yes, I recognise that the hostility or disinterest that the university was meant that I had no real future there, you know, to get on, they’ve got to join in and play to the same song shape.

 

Bryn Edwards 

And I’ve had on the podcast previously, Dr. Lynn Beasley was the chief scientist of Western Australia. And, you know, part of her career is sang for to a tutor who gather the latitude to go and ask the difficult questions. But she recognised by and large, you have to kowtow to get somewhere. So yeah. And likewise, myself, having been to university and then wanted to go back not long ago, and then realising that there was a place for me and now No, podcast. Yeah. So and I think it’s worthwhile just spending a second with that point, because there will be a lot of people out there who see science, very individual focus, and specialist thing, huh, like your concept of the classical scientist who looks at all things so very widely, I think I probably resonate with that having such a very educational and experienced background, but then he just makes science, so much more approachable to people. And, you know, it’s, I feel sometimes that science has become almost like this, this, this religion in and of itself, if the high priest scientist with the PhD says, you know, thou shalt rub this on the back of your ear, and scientists have said, then you’ll go and do it. And what’s the difference between that and the high priests of the group with ology, and, and, but you know, if you dial back from it Sciences is, is a way of us to investigate. It’s a very mind orientated game, as opposed to a holding body type of thing. And sometimes it just thinks it loses its place, but at the same time, it then shuts itself off from the everyday person to investigate science by themselves, even if it’s repeating an experiment in the garage that somebody has done before just so you can actually see, feel and experience it yourself, let alone go and ask further questions.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

That’s right. So Found a number of people who’ve been inspired by what I do, who have performed their own garage experiments. And with great success, they’ve got YouTube channels, and that showing the effects of electrical scouring on planetary type surfaces. I did the first ones back in the 1990s. here in Canberra, actually, high voltage engineer who became interested in what I was doing, and he had a garage with the equipment look like that. From Back to Back to the Future. I was a mad scientist. Yeah, every, every piece of electrical equipment you can imagine. And so and he had a lot of fun, too, because he learned some things because I would ask questions that he hadn’t thought of. And so we’ll try that and see what happens. And, of course, this is the way that individuals contribute to science, because all all the great breakthroughs have come from individuals, not from the great teams of scientists working with a multi billion dollar facility. It’s the patient people who think and then try.

 

Bryn Edwards 

Yeah. So is the big leading question. Tell me about electric Really?

 

Wallace Thornhill 

Well, interestingly enough, while sciences going off with more and more complication, they introduce more and more imaginary forces and particles and whatnot. To keep the story going, the Electric Universe was born out of the notion of classical physics. And that is one of simplification. I’m not looking to complicate things more, because that more or less establishes your priesthood. Only they understand it. I thought, if I can understand the universe is not deliberately trying to be difficult. And it’s we who make it so because of our desire for control, control over others control over inflammation, all those kinds of things. I’ve always shared what I know, or what I think I know, at every step, simply on the basis that I’m happy to be pointed out where I’ve made a mistake, or there’s something else I should consider, and maybe I haven’t got the whole story, right. This is happening continually throughout my career, because I didn’t recognise that 1994 meeting that I mentioned, that there was no way I could do this on my own. And having made that decision, and also the decision, that meeting was the pioneers who got me to where I was then one died. Another one was too ill to come. And I thought, well, who else is going to do this? If I done

 

Bryn Edwards 

it just make.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

So I made the big decision at that meeting. And that was why I price back salvage, and I said you and I should work together. And it’s proved to be quite an amazing partnership. I hadn’t mentioned david, tell him what he actually contributed. And that is that he took bill McCarthy’s approach to the analysis of myth and creation myths and history. And in some of his the last work he did, he pointed out that strangely enough the right around the world. All of the ancient races and ancient sources we have were adamant that Saturn the ringed planet was a form of sun. Yeah, it was our form Islam. In fact, the words that are used for the sun Sol and Helios the classical night words for the sun, all originally applied to Saturn when we’re just transferred to the sun. Yes. Now that is a mind blowing thing to come across. Yes. And it was the discoveries of David Talbot and a couple of other mythos historians we call them. I felt that I had sufficient evidence. And the evidence is overwhelming that this was so that my job then was to try and understand that scientifically, I’ve always done the science, trying to make sense of the science. And it’s in doing that, that I’ve managed to figure out how gravity works, and that there is only a single force you need to deal with in the universe. And that’s the electric force. electric force. Yeah, magnetism, gravity, the nuclear forces are all manifestations of the electric force. And the reason that they’re different is that a different scales the the important aspect of how matter behaves in response to the electric poles. We’ll develop at the atomic level, subatomic level, the magnetic force. And at a lower level, again, the gravitational force. And you can keep going down in levels. And the next one deals with the precession of Mercury’s orbit, and so on. And all of this, I discovered only in the last year or two matches the research of a German scientist, new home diver, one of the top bicycle physicists, experimental physicists to I should point out, not just theoretical. And he developed a more general form of pure lines, long accurate lines, those gives you the equation that tells you the force between two charged particles. Yes, it’s a static formula, though, the two charged particles aren’t moving. What via Viber did was decide, let’s assume, make it General, say the two forces are moving with respect to one another, and they’re accelerating. And there are different masses. And they can be either the same charge or different charges. Sorry. And by doing that, 14 years before, the top physicists in the UK, figured out how an atom was constructed. He had done it with his electrodynamic law, instead of electrostatics. This is electrodynamics, things are moving everything in the universe is moving. Yes. And when I recognised that I thought we were within a hair’s breadth of the Electric Universe, right there. Wow. And, of course, after goodness knows how many decades of research to actually come to that point where you go right back to, and you look at history, this is it, history is important, you have to know why we made the decisions we made back in the Einsteins time, and other, you know, the times of other people, you have to look at the context, and what was going on at the time, what these people were doing and what others thought you can’t just accept what an expert says that, you know, now here this, you know, that’s the result of a show of hands and science isn’t done democratically. You know, it’s either right or it’s wrong. And yet, a lot of the science today, there’s a lot of people with their hands up saying, hang on, hang on, I think you’ve got it wrong, that they’re not being paid attention to, they’re not allowed to publish in the big journals, a sensor. And so you’ve got this sort of subculture of thousands of scientists around the world, who know, science is in real trouble, and are busily putting forward ideas. And I see a lot of them because they write to me and say, What do you think of this? The generally the fault at all of them, Mike, is to use the same language that scientists are using now. And a lot of it is meaningless. Yes, it’s quite amazing to understand that. We have no definition for things like mass, or energy. And we declare things a universal constant, like the universal constant of gravitation when we don’t know what gravity is. No, Einstein did away with the force of gravity. Try telling that to somebody who’s fallen over and hurt them. So

 

Bryn Edwards 

there’s constant change.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

And the constants aren’t constant. The guy

 

Bryn Edwards 

was watching a lecture with Dr. Rupert Sheldrake. Yes. And he was explaining how he started getting curious about constant and out gravity changes as well. How does if it’s a constant, how’s that happen?

 

Wallace Thornhill 

That’s right, they force it to be a constant by defining your standards in terms of the speed of light. Indeed, and this is crazy.

 

Bryn Edwards 

So if we can just take pause that so let me get the strike. And all the forces that were aware of electromagnetic nuclear gravity, Ma, one form of electricity, or another, or one level of electricity

 

Wallace Thornhill 

will respond. It’s all the response to matter to the electric poles.

 

Bryn Edwards 

Right. So it’s kind of questions that jumped out for me. Now, the first one is, what is electricity that?

 

Wallace Thornhill 

Well, and this is where I’m quite happy to say that at present, we do not know. Right? For instance, they talk about the Electric Universe and the electrical power, which is obviously universal. And they say, Where does it come from? And I say, I don’t know. All we can do is say what We observe what in the universe is that there are these electrical currents flowing all over the place this, this web that they call is only possible if I actually delineating electric currents, because gravity doesn’t form strings of things that it forms clumps. Yeah. And with that realisation you can then you can build a whole new cosmology. Yeah. And the beauty of doing that is that you have now tied your cosmology to human experience dating right back to the earliest memories of the Egyptians. And, you know, the earliest civilizations, the Australian Aborigines have some of the best stories around the most accurate ones, because they remember their things in terms of song and dance, and ritual, rather than words, which can be misinterpreted. And so this is, this is real cosmology. cosmology is often called the queen of the sciences, which means that everything has to fit underneath. But right now, the cosmologists don’t pay any attention to anyone else, but themselves. Which means that what they say is of no use to us, you know, it’s all very, makes a good story, good science fiction story. But it has no actual use for us. It doesn’t tell us why we here what life is what we would have places in the universe with respect to everything else, whether there is life in the universe, and what would it be like? These questions are unanswerable with modern science. You it also, because they are restricted to a gravitational cosmology, that is one which they think requires things metal to attract other metal. And that’s all it does, they cannot do anything else. So they’re restricted to explosions to spread matter out. And then collisions when it all falls back again, which is pretty crackpot theory when you think about it. And one of the top astronomers of the 20th century, who was prevented from using telescopes once he published these or tried to publish his your original discoveries pointed out that no, when you look out there, the universe is in balance. It’s not expanding, which meant, as he said, that means that gravity must have a repulsive aspect to it. Otherwise, the whole thing would just collapse the conscious sit there. You know. And, of course, besides mean, the astronomer priests didn’t like that one little bit because of destroyed the Big Bang story. And

 

Bryn Edwards 

everything’s expanding out.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

Yeah. Yeah, one of the top scientists of the time subramanium Chandra Sega scribbled across the top of Helton ops contribution and said, This exceeds my imagination. Well, that’s what science is all about. You know, if it excludes your imagination, get out of the way and let the person who’s imagining it ever go. Hmm.

 

Bryn Edwards 

So how does? How does this apply to the everyday person? What has it? How does the older perception of cosmology and physics affect our reality? And how does this change that so

 

Wallace Thornhill 

it has a huge impact, when you think about modern cosmology is a hopeless one. And I mean, hope less, simply because it all started with the Big Bang. And then the end is so if it’s going to expand and accelerate the expansion, it’ll end up the lights a little wink out and it’s just darkness, you know, good night, let’s say hi hopeless cosmology. Also, it paints us as being on an isolated little ball of rock. orbiting around an insignificant star and an insignificant galaxy and trillions of others. The sense of isolation both in space and time is overwhelming. Whereas the Electric Universe, which as I said now, is based on vilhelm Weber’s mathematics in that theory, and also in true ones long time isn’t involved. Now that is profound. It means that Einstein’s idea that you cannot transfer information at anything faster than the speed of light is nonsense. It means that we are part of a connected, conscious universe. That changes everything. That means that we’re a manifestation of the consciousness of the universe. And you say, Well, why are we here? And you say, well, you are the self referential part of that universe, we are able to witness experience. And what we witness and experience is not lost, because it’s fed back to the universe. Yes. And we manifest, in my opinion, with a purpose that is very quickly knocked out of us when we’re very little, quite often. But those people who do recognise no child, some propensity or some desire to do a some thing, often surprised by just how amazing and successful that person can be, that child will become, yeah, so if you look at your own children, and they’re all different, they all came here with a different purpose, and then nurture them, nurture them as a sentient being, and connected to you. We’re all connected. This is the other part of it.

 

Bryn 

Yes.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

So this separation, the idea that we’re separate, and that nationalism is a good idea. And Scott Nelson’s just goes out the window. And you see that we, if we ever began to communicate with more intelligent life, we got to get a whole lot more intelligence. The other aspect of this model two is that we’re wasting our time using radio telescopes to talk to highly intelligent civilizations because they wouldn’t use radio. guess it’d be like using smoke signals, you know, the Intercontinental transfer of data just doesn’t work. They’re not stupid enough to use something where the fastest conversation you could have would be with a nine year turnaround time to the nearest star.

 

Bryn 

Yeah.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

All all matter in the universe is connected in real time. And this is exactly how gravity works. The earth is responding to all the metal in the universe in real time.

 

Bryn Edwards 

So how do we speak to all intelligent? Oh,

 

Wallace Thornhill 

the speed of thought? Thought is infinite speed. Mm hmm. As you can see, this absolutely changes everything.

 

Bryn Edwards 

Yes. Hmm. And more and more, I hear this similar, similar sort of messages coming to me whether it’s through scientists, you know, like minded scientists like yourself, or, yeah, I was handed the scientist before. quantum physicist is telling me about, you know, particles, doesn’t matter how far apart there are lists getting together at the same time.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

That universe that’s not spooky.

 

Bryn Edwards 

Yes. Because with it being all connected, and yet, you can go into more deeper, older spiritual realms that look at the connectedness in the unity consciousness, and infinite consciousness, and, and they all start coming together.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

Yeah, well, the woowoo aspects of quantum theory are not at all, you know, in the Electric Universe, because the experimenter is part of the experiment. Yeah, you decided to do something in the middle of an experiment, then that will have an effect even if you think about it. It’s not spooky at all, you are connected to everything in that experiment, including the particles that you’re playing with.

 

Bryn Edwards 

Hmm. I got the question, how does this change change everything? Because we are all connected? We are all you know, we are all in this together. Yeah. And there is no escaping. And therefore the ability to communicate outwards is also by going further inwards.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

Yes, I think I mentioned that I read an article in the secular heretic, the Canadian journal, which has just started up that’s an arts type of journal, but I wrote it because it’s the title of the journal, the secular heretic can hear my a heretic in the scientific realm. And it’s, it’s been interesting to see the response to that it’s been very good simply because I’ve tried to paint this coherent, big picture. And that’s what the Electric Universe is. It’s always been for me this huge puzzle, jigsaw puzzle with all of these pieces, and so I’m, I spend more than half the day you just reading scientific reports and checking to see whether those reports, once I’ve looked at it, I can fit it into the puzzle. And if I can’t, then I got more work to do. In the last few years, the bits that don’t fit, reduced to almost nothing, and the surprises that scientists are continually reporting in the Sox news, another surprise to me, they, they just fit now I can see where they fit. And this is a good test of a cosmology. And it can be in any field, it can be in biology, chemistry, nuclear physics. Anything. Mm

 

Bryn Edwards 

hmm. So how are I’ll come back a minute. And I’ll just this link to. So we’ve got very much the cause. Yeah, the styles of cosmology and everything around it, we’ve got us sent in beams. What about the planet as a living being,

 

Wallace Thornhill 

we’re an integral part of the earth. This is one thing that’s not considered by all these people who are suggesting we colonise Mars in the moon or anywhere else, we will no longer be Earthlings if we do. And so you cannot, you cannot predict the consequences. I mean, you send people into space on these, you know, these space station send you out there for months, and when they come back, they’re almost crippled, you know, they have to regenerate the bones and muscles and everything to function, you know, prison situation. But there’s far more to it than that on a very subtle level. We are energetically a part of the earth. So this idea that if we miss this earth we can go elsewhere is nonsense. In fact, I’ve not been taught that in a homoeopathic sense. Any Body Body who has sets off for a long journey in space should have a homoeopathic signal sent to them just to maintain contact with the earth

 

Bryn Edwards 

and the consciousness of it.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

Yeah. Yeah. homoeopathy, I mean is a no brainer when you understand the Electric Universe and a lot of the so called it natural therapies which based on subtle energy, they call it well, it is subtle, it’s very subtle. But it is nonetheless, electric resonances between similar confirmed molecules, biological molecules, and life itself is dependent upon instructions from beyond the body to build it as part of your consciousness. And so people, they look at auras and all of this kind of thing can suddenly begin we can actually start to begin doing science on the things which are present are taboo. Yes, and no side no subject should be taboo unless you can critically point out the faults in it. And no scientists have been able to do that with these things. I mean, homoeopathy was the major form of therapies in some European countries, and then still is. And some of the best work on bioenergetics in that field of being is being done in Germany. But this is not taught. In fact, it’s taboo. And anyone who raises it at university will be pointed to an error of their ways will be pointed out now in certain manner. And it’s also rather saddening to see the kind of behaviour of governments and on the advice of experts, and the things they’re doing, which are totally misguided. There’s so much to be done. What I do is, I paint the big picture, I cannot go into the finest detail because I just didn’t know one man can do it. But I can point to things which I think will work. And I think the best example I can give is SFR experiment, which is to reproduce a star in the laboratory. And it’s worked. For a few million dollars. We’ve done what governments have been trying to do around the world capitalist billions of dollars over the years to produce fusion energy, like the sun. But that’s an assumption. They assume that their crackpot model is how this all stars work. But it’s so complicated and so unlikely. You imagine, it’s a kind of a version of the hydrogen bomb, which doesn’t just goes off slowly. But if that was the case, that’s the most unstable system I can think of. So this night sky should look like the Fourth of July or star six. Floating all over the place? Yeah, no, it’s just a, it is a crackpot story. But it was made up at a time when nuclear energy would have been first discovered. And the science of plasma behaviour of the universe is bathed in plasma that’s charged particles and magnetic and electric fields that science was in its infancy, it’s just a poor timing. And so everyone went wild with the idea of Wow, all that energy locked up in the metal,

 

Bryn Edwards 

interesting moves through.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

Yeah. The. So it was just a, an unhappy coincidence that Eddington at that time jumped on the notion that the only way to keep the sun shining for billions of years was to invoke nuclear energy. And then they had the problem of Well, how do we do that. And so they then built a model, which had no reference at all to what we’re seeing in the sky. And otherwise, I didn’t look at the granulations in any detail to say that they don’t conform to convection. They didn’t look at the fact that sunspots are dark, which suggests that whatever’s underneath that bright outer region is cool. Underneath the Electric Universe model, it is cool. The stars and planets have made exactly the same way in the same process. At the same time, then the planets not built from the leftovers. They’re all built at the same time. So star has a planetary style interior. Quite a large one. But then it has an extensive atmosphere, which may be 100,000 kilometres or several hundred thousand kilometres deep. And right at the very top, in what we would call the ionosphere is electrical activity guide taking place which generates nuclear energy at the same time, in a benign way, in a controlled by one, which actually has a transistor action to control the brightness of the output. That’s why they shine so steadily. And we’ve reproduced it in the laboratory and China works. Even to the point of the nuclear actions, which shown that the bright this sunshine is largely it’s all happening in front of our eyes, it’s transforming the lighter elements into heavier elements in what I call catalytic nuclear reactions. You don’t need to smash atoms together, all you do is nuclear chemistry. On the to do nuclear chemistry, you do it in a plasma. You don’t do it in a test you. nobody’s interested in this. Oh, yes. There are some people very interested in it. Yes. But no one is, I mean, this would have been absolute headline news, if it was known and accepted, generally. But we have this huge Titanic of modern science. And try to turn that around, I think it will have to hit the iceberg. A little smarter. And there’s so much invested in maintaining steady as she goes in big organisations, and science has become one of the biggest. And now, it’ll be like in the past that it requires a revolution to stop the change course. revolutions generally occur when people are fed up with what’s going on and get pretty fed up with what’s going on right now.

 

Bryn Edwards 

Yes, yes. Doesn’t seem like science is helping us a great deal. Yeah. So if somebody and somebody is intrigued by this, short of going on YouTube channel, which has got some great movies on that, to bring people in, what are sort of the top three or four things to consider, which can start sparking that interest for the layperson.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

I think it’s a case of finding out something that is of interest to you. And with our meetings, we have covered all sorts of subjects, including electric biology, and it’s not it’s not all about space. You know. We have Rupert Sheldrake has spoken at a number of conferences going back to about 2000. The early 2000s anyway,

 

Bryn Edwards 

telling the idea of morphic resonance.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

That’s right because I picked up on his work shortly after He published that, because I realised that he was going in the same direction I was. And that was this connectedness with something beyond the body that I mean, this is being tested in laboratories and found to work, ASP remote viewing things like that. In fact, our Safar experiment, the first one we did, which was just a build job, just to test the concept to make sure we could actually produce the phenomena we needed was right next door to the Faraday cage they use for remote viewing experiments some years earlier, which proved that works, you know, you cannot shield thought, thought and gravity, they’re the same force actually the same force pass through matter, you know, through it doesn’t matter what it is. It’s it’s available. This is why I can have living creatures discovered kilometres below the surface and at the bottom of the ocean dates. They get their signals just the same as we do on the surface because you cannot heal from

 

Bryn Edwards 

suicide what first three or four things people can

 

Wallace Thornhill 

get their head through. Okay. I’m David Talbott and I wrote two books back quite some years ago now. The first one was called thunderbolts of the gods, which outlays dive Talbots thesis, but then, sort of at the end of it, hints about the Electric Universe model. And then we did the Electric Universe. We co authored the two books, he is the top author in the first one on the top author in the second. Now, in that first book, the Electric Universe, I pulled my punches quite a bit, I didn’t want to include too much. So it’s mostly about astronomy. But I’m not working right now on the book, which will cover the whole lot. And hopefully, yeah, I haven’t published before long. But that will chart the sequence of ideas and as they occurred, and how it all fits together. And yeah, chapter and verse for people. So that when people ask me questions, which I do and large numbers, I can just refer them to you know, have a look at chapter silence, I will

 

Bryn Edwards 

be pretty empty after that.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

I’m looking forward to maybe a bit of rest bite.

 

Bryn Edwards 

Yeah, I think what you said to me yesterday, respect is the book I need to write but for her to come out to me. Super, what, um, what do you learned about yourself on this journey with the Electric Universe?

 

Wallace Thornhill 

Oh, quite a few things. At some point, I recognised that my intuition was the chief guide, that I intuitively respond to something when I think it’s right. And that was whether it occurred with the electric sun model, when I first read it back in back in 1972. And so and then, but then it takes me years to overcome this problem that everyone does know. Certainly, all the experts can be wrong, you know, how am I ever going to present this without looking like an idiot? And this happened to him when I had realised that Einstein had to go, you know, just a few small things like that. How do I explain this to people? And then that’s the real problem. How do I explain this? And why is that the common man will understand that using a whole lot of language, which is largely meaningless. I think people have recognised in me, an obsession with this, but it’s not an obsession so much as a realisation that this is my inspiration. This is what I’m here to do. It’s like somebody who realises they want to be a great dancer or singer or something like that. I realised that I was on this passion as a young boy before a teenage I used to ask my dad questions about why doesn’t the earth just spiral into the sun? And he couldn’t answer it. But it was a question you know, that I felt needed answering. Things like that. So it’s been a lifelong adventure.

 

Bryn Edwards 

There’s been a quiet connection with a deep sense of knowing and this

 

Wallace Thornhill 

is also I’ve been blessed with infor standard his eyesight for most of my life. So I needed it, but I’m scanning things at high speed. Because I tend to look for the headlines. Now. If there’s something that stands out, then I’ll read further, deeper. Otherwise, I’ll never get through all the material because it can be any subject that will something just striking I think, hang on. That’s interesting, a bit of look at that. So I’m not restricted to any one subject.

 

Bryn 

Yeah. When God knows it,

 

Wallace Thornhill 

I was just gonna say that. I think the best indication of that was that at university, during a science degree, I was the only one amongst the science people who haunted the anthropology selves of the university library. And the reason for doing that was to just to check that the koski hadn’t cherry picked these sources. But once I got started, I realised now, he certainly hasn’t, he could have just written 10 books, and filled it with data, which matched what you’re saying,

 

 

huh?

 

Bryn Edwards 

How do you educate yourself grounded through all of this? Because it must get heady stuff after a while?

 

Wallace Thornhill 

How do I learn

 

Bryn Edwards 

how to keep yourself grounded? Oh,

 

Wallace Thornhill 

I have a family. I have three daughters, a dear wife is stood by me. And my obsessions always use. And I’ve got nine grandchildren and one great granddaughter. So I got plenty of grounding.

 

Bryn Edwards 

And see? And the last question I asked all my guests on why real estate that it’s a hypothetical one by enjoy the answer from all my guest is that if you can take one nugget of information and just load it into collective consciousness, so everybody just gets it? What would that be?

 

Wallace Thornhill 

Huh, good question. I think that the thing that is most important, and it’s something that occurred to velikovsky, at the end of his life, and he talks about it in mankind in amnesia, is that if we are to heal from our irrational behaviour, we must understand our past. And there was a Canadian documentary done, called the bonds of the past, which was recorded in 1972 by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. And that is a very personal interview, I’m looking at velikovsky his work. And at the end of that he describes his fears for mankind. And he said, the only way for men to have a future on this planet is to understand his past. his and her past. The and this, I think is critical. Once you understand our past, it is such an amazing story. There’s no science fiction story ever written that can come near it. Just trying to imagine what our forebears had to put up with. You realise why they built all those weird stand structures around the world, our shoulders. In fact, the druids knew they were shelters, but nobody’s listening, because they’ve got no context with what our forebears experienced is totally beyond our understanding, because there’s nothing like it today. We thought we were doomed. We were we’d had it the earth was being destroyed before our very eyes. And yet we came through it. amazing story.

 

Bryn Edwards 

For us has been absolutely riveting talking to you today. If people want to come and find out more about you and the Thunderbolts Project, where can they go?

 

Wallace Thornhill 

My personal website, which is a kind of a historical repository, it shows my progress from back in 1998 or so. Today, some of the earlier articles will have errors in them small errors. thunderbolts dot entire is our main website where the public can get involved. There’s a forum there’s all sorts of means of getting involved is a nonprofit organisation set up in the US. And it’s got links everywhere and the number of subscribers is in the figures 150,000 or more present. And our YouTube videos I think over 5 million views of our videos, some of them feature length and the works of data Talbert, his series of videos, paint the picture of what the ancients went through

 

Bryn Edwards 

superbe plenty of stuff to go and dive into that and Oh, yes, yes,

 

Wallace Thornhill 

you get lost on the tribe.

 

Bryn Edwards 

Well, it’s thank you very much for your time.

 

Wallace Thornhill 

Thanks, Bryn for the opportunity.

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